performing arts – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 21:21:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png performing arts – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 Concert will pay tribute to historic black composer – InkFreeNews.com https://allanpettersson.org/concert-will-pay-tribute-to-historic-black-composer-inkfreenews-com/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 22:30:21 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/concert-will-pay-tribute-to-historic-black-composer-inkfreenews-com/ WABASH — A concert will pay tribute to a historic black composer. The Manchester Symphony Orchestra celebrates the “Trailblazers” at their first concert of 2022. It will be at 3pm on Sunday March 13 at the Honeywell Center in Wabash. The concert features “Symphony No. 1 in E Minor,” written by Florence Price, the first […]]]>

WABASH — A concert will pay tribute to a historic black composer. The Manchester Symphony Orchestra celebrates the “Trailblazers” at their first concert of 2022. It will be at 3pm on Sunday March 13 at the Honeywell Center in Wabash.

The concert features “Symphony No. 1 in E Minor,” written by Florence Price, the first African-American woman to have a composition performed by a major symphony orchestra.

Its pioneering symphony was “created by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Frederick Stock at the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair,” said OSM conductor Debra Lynn.

Lynn added: “Price was a domestic violence survivor and single mother, who had experienced extreme poverty and homelessness. Her life and legacy have become a great inspiration to women songwriters and songwriters of color around the world.

Lynn carefully curates Manchester Symphony Orchestra concerts to include works by women and others, who have never been well represented in the world of the symphony. It selects musical pieces and presents artists from a wide spectrum.

“Trailblazers” also marks the return of the MSO Young Artists Concerto and Aria Competition after six years.

Three performers have been selected to perform as soloists during the concert:

Andre Burns, a high school student from Merrillville, will perform the aria Vainement Ma Bien Aimée by Edouard-Victoire-Antoine Lalo. Lydia Kelly, a biology-chemistry major at MU, will perform Rosauro’s “Concerto No. 1 for Marimba and Orchestra, Movement IV, Despedida.” Ben Morton, a sophomore at Homestead High School, will perform “Piano Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 22, Movement 1.”

Tickets are $15 for general admission and are free for UM students, faculty, and staff with UM ID and for anyone 18 and under. Masks, proof of vaccination and proof of a negative COVID test are not required at Honeywell locations.

Visit www.manchestersymphonyorchestra.org to purchase tickets.

Lynn is Director of Choral and Vocal Studies at the University of Manchester. Composer, who will conduct for the third time this spring at Carnegie Hall, she is a collaborative musical storyteller.

The Manchester Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1939 through a partnership with the people of County Wabash and what was then Manchester College. It thrives today as an essential component of the rich performing arts culture in the region. Its members are a mix of professional and community musicians, Manchester students and several high school students.

The “Trailblazers” concert is sponsored by MPS Egg Farms.

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LE CHEVALIER brings the life and music of an 18th century black composer to the stage February 18-20 https://allanpettersson.org/le-chevalier-brings-the-life-and-music-of-an-18th-century-black-composer-to-the-stage-february-18-20/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 03:37:24 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/le-chevalier-brings-the-life-and-music-of-an-18th-century-black-composer-to-the-stage-february-18-20/ In partnership with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association, the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts and Concert Theater Works, Music of the Baroque presents the Midwest premiere of “The Chevalier,” a new concert play written and directed by Bill Barclay. “Le Chevalier” recounts the life and music of the 18th century black composer Joseph […]]]>

In partnership with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association, the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts and Concert Theater Works, Music of the Baroque presents the Midwest premiere of “The Chevalier,” a new concert play written and directed by Bill Barclay.

“Le Chevalier” recounts the life and music of the 18th century black composer Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, master composer, virtuoso violinist, friend of Mozart, music teacher of Marie-Antoinette, the best fencer in Europe, general of the first black regiment in Europe and a crusader for the abolition of slavery. Adopting a “concert theater” approach, featuring the interaction of four actors with excerpts from orchestra and chamber music, Barclay weaves Bologna’s remarkable history into his own compositions, ultimately confusing the French Revolution with the social and political unrest of today’s society.

“The Chevalier” stars Brendon Elliott as violinist Bologna and four accomplished actors including Barclay as Choderlos de Laclos; RJ Foster as Joseph Bologna, Knight of St. George; Merritt Janson as Marie Antoinette and David Joseph as Mozart.

“The Knight” features music by Joseph Bologna (1745-1799) with additional music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and Christoph Willibald Glück (1714-1787). Dame Jane Glover will conduct the music of the Baroque Orchestra at the three Chicago-area venues in selections showcasing the breadth of Bologna’s compositional output, from violin concertos to symphonies, string quartets to ballets. The musical arrangements are by Barclay. Other members of the art/design team will be announced at a later date.

Performances of “Le Chevalier” will take place on Saturday, February 19, 2022 at 7:30 p.m. at the North Shore Performing Arts Center and on Sunday, February 20, 2022 at 8 p.m. at the Symphony Center at 8 p.m. A free community performance will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, February 18, 2022 at the Kehrein Center for the Arts in Chicago’s Austin neighborhood. Tickets for this show were made possible through the generous support of the Zell Family Foundation.

The year is 1778 and a bedridden, bankrupt Mozart is transported to the Chevalier’s kitchen. Despite obvious differences, these two geniuses forge a friendship as equals as they navigate the new racial politics of a city hostile to outsiders. At the same time, the Chevalier’s weekly music lessons with Marie Antoinette associate him with the monarchy at a time of civil unrest, and he must choose between his loyalty to the crown and the violent pursuit of abolition as the Revolution ignites France.

“In ‘The Knight,’ Bill Barclay has created concert drama that resonates with the times,” says Declan McGovern, Executive Director of Baroque Music. “It tells the story and features the music of a composer of color who fought injustice in the 18th century, but whose story speaks just as strongly in today’s changing world. At Music of the Baroque , we are thrilled to team up with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association, the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts and the Kehrein Center for the Arts to ensure that as many people as possible, from all corners of our community, have the opportunity to discover the remarkable life and music of Joseph Bologna. »

“Baroque music is such a valuable part of the performance offering at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts in Skokie,” said the Centre’s Managing Director, Michael Pauken. “I am thrilled that we are able to collaborate on this exciting and important project. ‘The Knight’ will sound and look great on our stage and I know our audiences will enjoy learning more about this fascinating historical figure.”

“Le Chevalier” is also closely linked to the promotion of anti-racism in concert music. The production raises money for the Sphinx National Alliance for Audition Support, which helps young musicians of color with the cost of auditioning for jobs in American orchestras. Commissioned by the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 2018, “The Chevalier” premiered in 2019 during the inaugural season of the Tanglewood Learning Institute and was a 2020 Eugene O’Neill National Playwrights Conference finalist and recipient of a National Endowment of the Arts Grant in 2021.

“We are thrilled to join Music of the Baroque and our other broadcasters in sharing this opportunity for audiences to learn more about the life and music of Joseph Bologna,” said CSOA President Jeff Alexander. . “His significant contributions to orchestral music are something to celebrate and we look forward to welcoming this program to the Symphony Center.”

“The Chevalier,” written and directed by Bill Barclay, will be played at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, February 19 at the North Shore Center in Skokie, 9501 Skokie Blvd. and 8 p.m. on Sunday, February 20 at the Symphony Center, 220 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago.

Individual concert tickets cost between $25 and $100 and are available now at the box offices of the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts (northshorecenter.org) and the Symphony Center (cso.org). Discounts for groups, students and seniors are available.

Tickets are now available for the community performance on February 18 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kehrein Center for the Arts, located at 5628 W. Washington Blvd. in Chicago. Tickets are free, but reservations are required. For tickets or more information, visit baroque.org/chevalier-austin.

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Album featuring pieces by the Grammy-nominated Turkish composer https://allanpettersson.org/album-featuring-pieces-by-the-grammy-nominated-turkish-composer/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/album-featuring-pieces-by-the-grammy-nominated-turkish-composer/ Producer Judith Sherman has been nominated for the 64th Grammy Awards with the album “Dances of The Yogurt Maker”, featuring pieces by Turkish composer Erberk Eryılmaz. The album, which earned Sherman a Grammy Award nomination in the “Producer of the Year” category, consists of melodies prepared by Eryılmaz drawing inspiration from folk music from many […]]]>

Producer Judith Sherman has been nominated for the 64th Grammy Awards with the album “Dances of The Yogurt Maker”, featuring pieces by Turkish composer Erberk Eryılmaz.

The album, which earned Sherman a Grammy Award nomination in the “Producer of the Year” category, consists of melodies prepared by Eryılmaz drawing inspiration from folk music from many parts of Anatolia such as Silifke, Thrace, Aegean and Antakya. Eryılmaz used Turkish instruments such as wooden spoons, drums and darbukas in the production of his compositions.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA), Eryılmaz, who is also an academician at the Performing Arts Faculty of Ankara University of Music and Fine Arts, said he received his first education music at the Ankara State Conservatory of Hacettepe University. He then went to the United States and pursued musical studies at the Hartt School, Carnegie Mellon and Rice Universities.

Noting that the education system in the United States aims to train research musicians, Eryılmaz added, “Authenticity is the most important element there. A musician must be authentic to have a place in the history of music.

Eryılmaz is interested in folk music from the Middle East and Eastern Europe. While in the United States, he tried to learn and play the melodies of these regions, which affected the rest of his songwriting career.

Eryılmaz said that he organized five Turkish music festivals with the Hoppa project in the United States. In these festivals, they gave concerts of Turkish folk, classical and contemporary music and organized seminars and exhibitions.

Informing about Sherman’s “Dances of the Yogurt Maker”, Eryılmaz said that they produced the album with Carpe Diem String Quartet last year. By his own assessment, he accompanied the quartet playing piano, wooden spoons, drum and darbuka.

Eryılmaz hinted that the album both reflects his own musical tastes and serves as a product of the interaction of Turkish folk music and different cultures in Turkey.

Stating that producer Sherman has already won 11 Grammys, Eryılmaz continued, “She was nominated for Producer of the Year with our album. We were so excited.”

“Sherman is a legendary producer. When she came to the recording session for our album, she knew all six works on the album in depth and led the musicians in the best way. Witnessing her musical perspective was was a great experience for me.”

Eryılmaz said the album team is looking forward to the 2022 Grammy Awards. The ceremony was scheduled for January 31 in Los Angeles with a live audience and performances. However, it was recently postponed by its organizers due to the omicron variant. A new date has not yet been announced.

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John Adams is both composer and conductor in the Seattle Symphony’s comeback engagement https://allanpettersson.org/john-adams-is-both-composer-and-conductor-in-the-seattle-symphonys-comeback-engagement/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/john-adams-is-both-composer-and-conductor-in-the-seattle-symphonys-comeback-engagement/ [ad_1] Editor’s Note: In view of the rapid spread of the omicron variant of the coronavirus, please take into account the safety recommendations of local health authorities as they are updated, and check your event’s website for COVID-19 requirements and the latest information. Seattle Symphony audiences have another reason to be proud of their band. […]]]>


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Editor’s Note: In view of the rapid spread of the omicron variant of the coronavirus, please take into account the safety recommendations of local health authorities as they are updated, and check your event’s website for COVID-19 requirements and the latest information.

Seattle Symphony audiences have another reason to be proud of their band.

Along with the increase in international recognition in recent years – the prestigious British magazine Gramophone named them Orchestra of the Year in 2018 – these musicians have forged permanent links with one of the most revered figures in the field. Composer and conductor John Adams returns Jan. 6-8 to conduct what he considers “an excellent orchestra” in a program dedicated to his music.

“I’ve always had a great atmosphere with them,” Adams said in a telephone interview from his home in Berkeley, Calif. This engagement marks his fourth tour with the Seattle Symphony since his podium debut here in 2004. As a conductor, he typically mixes something from the familiar repertoire with his own work, so the decision to embark on a program entirely Adams represents yet another vote of confidence in the ability of the orchestra.

“Seattle Symphony has been very fortunate to have worked with John Adams on several occasions, always with excellent reviews,” observes Elena Dubinets, artistic director of the London Philharmonic, who worked with Adams during her long tenure as a planner. artistic performance with Seattle Symphony. “It was a treat for the musicians to be able to study his own music under his direction. Imagine if they could work on Beethoven’s symphonies under this composer’s baton.

Adams turns 75 in February and is working hard on his latest opera, a treatment of Shakespeare’s “Anthony and Cleopatra” on his own libretto. Yet he also takes the time to lead, mentor and serve as a deeply engaged musical citizen.

Just because Adams has been ranked among the Most Performed Living Composers for some time, doesn’t mean his music is easy to play. Far from there. In order for a piece to unleash the uplifting effect of becoming ‘full of Adams’, musicians must master a language of powerful harmonic power, dazzling instrumental colors, and incisive and intricate rhythmic patterns – all while making it so natural and grounded. that rock or blues.

This is all the more the case in a program which, as Adams says, presents his music in its most “extrovert” aspect, starting with the brief and invigorating “Short Ride in a Fast Machine” that he has. written in 1986 in concert form. opening fanfare.

In his orchestral music and operas, Adams has developed an instantly recognizable style that continues to influence a new generation of composers – a style that mixes excitement, pathos and joker humor in unexpected allies. Yet he is a “project specific” composer who constantly adapts and reinvents his language to suit the context of a particular piece.

You can see this malleability at work even when Adams adopted formats as old as symphony and concerto. His Seattle Symphony program includes one-of-a-kind approaches to these ideas.

“City Noir” is a symphonic meditation on what he calls “the dark and eerie chiaroscuro” of Hollywood noir films and the anxious energy of post-war Los Angeles. Adams likens his approach to “a long traveling shot” – like the one with which Orson Welles’ 1958 film “Touch of Evil” famously opens.

Written for Gustavo Dudamel’s inaugural season with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 2009, “City Noir” features an important part for alto saxophone (Timothy McAllister will be the soloist) and boasts “the surprisingly small tradition of symphony orchestral pieces rooted in a largely jazz sensibility, “Adams says.” It’s in my DNA, my parents both being jazz enthusiasts and growing up listening to all this great big band music, especially Duke Ellington. “

Adams experiments with a variety of other American vernaculars in “Must the Devil Have All the Good Tunes?” », His third piano concerto. Taking its title from a saying attributed to Martin Luther, the concerto deconstructs and brings together the impulses of funk, gospel and barilhouse. The score includes instructions such as “Twitchy, botlike”.

“One of John’s great skills is to start with something fairly fixed, and as he turns and changes the music starts to acquire an irresistible sweep,” according to pianist Jeremy Denk. – even a Seattle favorite. Denk will appear as a soloist in “Devil,” also originally written for the LA Phil. “There is a kaleidoscopic quality to hearing the harmonies change – the joy of seeing certain pitches enter into the texture and then leave and be replaced by others – and an ecstasy to the rhythm. “

Denk takes on “Devil,” which is making its local premiere, for the first time in Seattle, but has performed several times under Adams’ baton. Many of the difficulties with the score, he notes, involve “rhythm and focus.” And because of the way it’s written, you are part of this vast engine of the orchestra and have to define your own identity without shaking the whole machine.

Adams first wrote “Devil” for pianist Yuja Wang and Dudamel, and began directing it himself on a European tour with Icelandic pianist Vikingur Ólafsson in 2020 – just before the world of performing arts collapsed. be closed by the pandemic. Each pianist has brought a distinct personality to the concerto, and this collaboration with Denk – Adams calls him “one of the most thoughtful pianists” – is likely to reveal even more sides. Having three pianists who mark your music, says Adams, “is a real luxury.”

John Adams’ music

A program entirely devoted to John Adams conducted by the composer, including his recent piano concerto “Must the Devil Have All the Good Tunes?” “With Jeremy Denk,” City Noir “with saxophonist Timothy McAllister and” Short Ride in a Fast Machine “.

7:30 p.m. January 6, 8 p.m. January 8; Seattle Symphony at Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; $ 24 to $ 134; 206-215-4747; more information, including COVID-19 requirements, at seattlesymphony.org

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Grammy Award-Winning Violinist Mark O’Connor Brings “An Appalachian Christmas” to Park City https://allanpettersson.org/grammy-award-winning-violinist-mark-oconnor-brings-an-appalachian-christmas-to-park-city/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/grammy-award-winning-violinist-mark-oconnor-brings-an-appalachian-christmas-to-park-city/ Grammy Award-winning violinist Mark O’Connor will celebrate “An Appalachian Christmas” with Park City on Tuesday at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts.Photo by Diana Rose Grammy Award-winning violinist Mark O’Connor remembers waiting until Christmas as a young musician so he could jam with his friends. “The summers were fantastic because of the trips to […]]]>

Grammy Award-winning violinist Mark O’Connor will celebrate “An Appalachian Christmas” with Park City on Tuesday at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts.
Photo by Diana Rose

Grammy Award-winning violinist Mark O’Connor remembers waiting until Christmas as a young musician so he could jam with his friends.

“The summers were fantastic because of the trips to all the different fiddle competitions, conventions and festivals, but when the school year started I couldn’t play with anyone except occasionally on the weekends,” O’Connor said. “That changed when the Christmas holidays came. People would come and jam with me.

These jam sessions consisted of fiddle tunes and folk and Christmas songs, he said.



“I’ve always associated American music with Christmas, because we turned those songs into folk music and let ourselves go on a lot of breakdowns,” O’Connor said.

Local music lovers will have a chance to experience these musical breakdowns, which carried over to O’Connor’s live performances, when the Park City Institute presents O’Connor”Appalachian Christmasconcert at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday, December 21.



“The first song we play is ‘Frosty the Snowman’ which is turned into a violin breakdown,” O’Connor said with a chuckle. “It makes an excellent violin piece.”

O’Connor’s wife, maggiealso famous violinist, and son, Foresta renowned session musician, part of the Grammy-winning O’Connor Band, will make the show a family affair.

“The band plays a lot,” O’Connor said. “We do instrumentals and there will be a lot of vocals, because we have great vocalists in Maggie and Forrest. I add some harmonies here and there.

Adding to the musical dynamic, O’Connor will not only play his violin, he will also play his acoustic guitar, mandolin and another instrument called the mandocello.

“The mandocello is this huge crazy mandolin, and the one I bring to Park City is a relic,” he said. “It’s a 1924 Gibson that I’ve had since I was 14. I rarely take it out on the road, but I have to for those Christmas songs.

The gig will start with the O’Connors and the band performing as an ensemble, before breaking things up into duets and solos, O’Connor said.

“The duets will be between Maggie and me or Forrest and me,” he said. “Then I will play solos on each of the instruments in succession.”

The concert is based on and named after O’Connor’s 2011 album “Appalachian Christmas”.

“Over the years, I’ve recorded Christmas songs here and there, and it added to all those songs on the album,” he said. “It’s a record made over a few decades and compiled into one release, so there’s a lot of variety.”

Violinist Maggie O’Connor will join her husband, Mark O’Connor, and their son, Forrest O’Connor, on stage at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts for Tuesday’s “An Appalachian Christmas” concert.
Photo taken by Southern Ground Photography

O’Connor, who performed with the Utah Symphony Orchestra at the Deer Valley Music Festival, decided to name the album “Appalachian Christmas” to continue the concept he and two other Grammy-winning musicians – the cellist Yo-Yo Ma and bassist Edgar Meyer – created with the albums “Appalachian Waltz” and “Appalachian Journey”.

“As I did with those albums, I thought about all those Christmas songs and the music that emanates from where we live in North Carolina,” O’Connor said. “There is a real and beautiful variety of musical styles that come from this part of the country. Sometimes people forget the diversity of music that follows the development of what I call the American fiddle over the past 300 years.

These diverse styles include blues, spirituals, ragtime, swing, bluegrass and folk, he said.

“It’s like musical education, because there are so many different musical languages, and ‘Appalachian Christmas’ represents that stylistic breadth of tradition — that mystical, magical nature of instrumental music from that region,” said O’Connor.

This diversity and the organic feel of the instruments he works with is another reason why O’Connor enjoys performing his holiday show.

“I love acoustic instruments, and I think those instruments and Christmas make a great combination,” he said. “You have the Christmas tree, with the wood and natural elements that most people bring home. Then you have these beautiful wooden instruments.

O’Connor also thinks there’s more music being played during the holiday season.

“When you think about it, people who don’t usually sing the rest of the year will find themselves singing Christmas songs,” he laughed. “So it all fits.”

O’Connor is grateful to be back on the road after canceling all concert appearances last year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“Maggie and I have kept ourselves busy by presenting 70 straight weeks of concerts online every Monday from home,” he said. “It kept us physically fit and kept us active.”

The two are also working on a new duet album and have pivoted The O’Connor Method, their music education string camps, to a virtual format.

“Our next will be the first week of January, but we hope to resume our in-person camps this summer,” he said.

O’Connor has also written and recorded a new solo guitar album called “Markology II”.

“The album is a 42-year sequel to the first solo guitar album I made when I was 16,” he said.

Multi-instrumentalist Forrest O’Connor, son of Grammy-winning violinist Mark O’Connor, will perform “An Appalachian Christmas” concert with his father and mother, Maggie O’Connor, at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday. .
Photo by John David Pittman

O’Connor dedicated “Markology II” to his mentor, bluegrass guitarist Tony Rice, who died a year ago.

“Tony played on my first album and helped me mix it,” O’Connor said. “He was a big brother to me.”

O’Connor appreciated that someone like Rice cared enough to work with him and would like more adults to help young people find their way into music.

“I like to remind people when they think of Christmas gifts for kids that they might want to try the gift of music or an instrument that those kids can practice and play with,” he said. “The playing of instruments is important in American culture. I think they should still be. If more people played instruments together, I think it would improve our culture.

One of O’Connor’s favorite childhood gifts was two years of music lessons given to him by his father’s boss.

“He could have gotten me a toy car kit or a train, but he paid for music lessons,” O’Connor said. “And look what it did.”

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Qatari composer Dana Al Fardan to perform at D’reesha Performing Arts Festival 2021 https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-al-fardan-to-perform-at-dreesha-performing-arts-festival-2021/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-al-fardan-to-perform-at-dreesha-performing-arts-festival-2021/ Doha: Qatari contemporary composer, Dana Al Fardan, will headline to perform seven songs from her fourth album, Indigo, at the first-ever D’reesha Performing Arts Festival 2021 in Doha. The live performance is set to feature a chamber orchestra, state-of-the-art light design and projection, and a captivating color palette to transform the open-air environment of the […]]]>

Doha: Qatari contemporary composer, Dana Al Fardan, will headline to perform seven songs from her fourth album, Indigo, at the first-ever D’reesha Performing Arts Festival 2021 in Doha.

The live performance is set to feature a chamber orchestra, state-of-the-art light design and projection, and a captivating color palette to transform the open-air environment of the Qatar Foundation’s ceremonial courtyard to Education City Doha.

The December 16 show at 8 p.m. is inspired by the album’s nod to Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s theory of color, who states: “We have observed that all of nature manifests itself through color in the sense of light. Therefore, by manipulating light and color with an infusion of sound, the Indigo concert changes the mood into a unique perception for each viewer.

Commenting on the upcoming concert, Dana Al Fardan said, “To headline this extraordinary event is an honor. The performing arts scene in Qatar is full of incredibly innovative artists, and I’m thrilled to be involved with D’reesha to help engage a new generation of talent in our communities.

“The concert will be an exciting and inspiring spectacle,” she continued. “Indigo breaks the rules of ‘selective absorption’ and works to connect the audience to their extra-spectral senses.

“What we’ve created is a remarkable experience that encourages viewers to grow and merge with their surroundings and within themselves on a much deeper level,” she added.

The D’reesha Performing Arts Festival will be a year-round performance lab that aims to empower students. It will culminate in an annual festival that will transform Education City into an open stage.

Event: Indigo Concert with Dana Al Fardan

Venue: Qatar Foundation, Education City Doha, Ceremonial Courtyard

Date: December 16, 2021

Time: 8 p.m.

Tickets: QR50 online

Registration required!

Visit www.qf.org.qa/community/dreesha-performing-arts-festival

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Norwegian composer is new dean of Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music in Singapore https://allanpettersson.org/norwegian-composer-is-new-dean-of-yong-siew-toh-conservatory-of-music-in-singapore/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/norwegian-composer-is-new-dean-of-yong-siew-toh-conservatory-of-music-in-singapore/ [ad_1] Dr Peter Tornquist is an influential voice in higher music education. (Photo: Kyrre Lien) The National University of Singapore (NUS) has appointed Norwegian composer and researcher Peter Tornquist as the new dean to lead the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music (YST). Dr Tornquist will begin his term in February 2022, the University recently […]]]>


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Dr Peter Tornquist is an influential voice in higher music education. (Photo: Kyrre Lien)

The National University of Singapore (NUS) has appointed Norwegian composer and researcher Peter Tornquist as the new dean to lead the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music (YST). Dr Tornquist will begin his term in February 2022, the University recently announcement.

Commenting on the appointment, NUS President Prof Tan Eng Chye said: “After rigorous international research, we are delighted to welcome Dr Peter Tornquist, who is an influential voice in higher music education. Peter’s work has played a central role in establishing artistic research as an essential area of ​​knowledge in modern conservatories, and a strategic tool for developing students as curious artists. With his deep understanding of the changing landscape of higher music education in the 21st century, I am confident that YST will continue to make great strides under Peter’s leadership.

Originally from Sweden, Dr Tornquist also grew up in Switzerland and Brazil, before settling in Oslo, Norway, where he studied composition with award-winning composer Professor Lasse Thoresen and completed his studies at the Royal College of Music. of London under the leadership of the British. composer George Benjamin.

Dr Tornquist joins YST after serving as Director of the Norwegian Academy of Music from 2013 to July 2021. During his tenure he contributed to the development of higher music education through an expanded network of strategic partnerships national and international and has helped position the Academy as one of the top ranked institutions in the performing arts world. A graduate of the Royal College of Music in London, he has received honorary scholarships from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and the Royal Northern College of Music in recognition of his services to music.

An active contributor to the international music community, Dr Tornquist has served as Chair of Institutional Accreditation for the Royal Danish College of Music in Copenhagen and has chaired institutional exams for numerous higher music education institutions in Europe and Asia. In Norway, he was president of Ny Musikk (the Norwegian section of the International Society for Contemporary Music) and vice-president of the Norwegian Association of Composers and the Norwegian Performing Rights Society.

YST Board Chair Ms. Chong Siak Ching said, “The YST Board and Management are delighted to welcome Dr. Tornquist to our conservatory. We are confident that it will continue to advance the artistic, educational, research and community work of YST, as the Conservatory increasingly grows as Asia’s most exciting international conservatory and one of the schools of most distinctive music in the world.

Dr Tornquist said: “I am delighted to join YST and to work alongside the team of highly qualified and dedicated colleagues here. YST has been a long-standing partner of the Norwegian Academy of Music, and I have been fortunate enough to know him on my previous visits. In the midst of a rapidly changing global economy, our job as educators is to prepare students to push the boundaries and explore the full potential of their musical identity. My sincere thanks to Professor Bernard Lanskey for his leadership in making YST the dynamic conservatory it is today, and I look forward to contributing my experience to furthering the Conservatory’s mission.

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Agenda: Rousing Rachmaninoff and the local composer ‘s world premiere mark 2nd ISO concert of the season https://allanpettersson.org/agenda-rousing-rachmaninoff-and-the-local-composer-s-world-premiere-mark-2nd-iso-concert-of-the-season/ https://allanpettersson.org/agenda-rousing-rachmaninoff-and-the-local-composer-s-world-premiere-mark-2nd-iso-concert-of-the-season/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 16:33:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/agenda-rousing-rachmaninoff-and-the-local-composer-s-world-premiere-mark-2nd-iso-concert-of-the-season/ [ad_1] The Illinois Symphony Orchestra recently resumed its concerts and will be playing a dynamic program for its second concert of the season on November 7. have not experienced live music for over 18 months. “What we want to do is make sure our audience comes to the concert and leaves very happy,” Lam said. […]]]>


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The Illinois Symphony Orchestra recently resumed its concerts and will be playing a dynamic program for its second concert of the season on November 7. have not experienced live music for over 18 months.

“What we want to do is make sure our audience comes to the concert and leaves very happy,” Lam said. “One of the things I said when we planned this was, ‘Let’s have some really good songs. “Everyone loves Rachmaninoff. We did the third piano concerto, but we didn’t do the second.

This will be the work of pianist Micah McLaurin, who makes his debut with the Illinois Symphony Orchestra (ISO) with Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Piano Concerto No. 2”. McLaurin first met Lam in Charleston, North Carolina, McLaurin’s hometown. Lam conducts both the Illinois Symphony and the Charleston Symphony, and he invited the young pianist to perform with the latter orchestra.

“This is how we are going to know each other,” McLaurin said. “We played Mozart’s ‘Concerto No. 20 in D minor’ in 2017. It was the first time we had worked together. We didn’t want to go back to Charleston anymore; we wanted to go elsewhere.

While taking refuge in his home during the pandemic, McLaurin experimented with different musical genres such as jazz and pop, often mixing classical music with other forms. Social media was a big outlet during his forties, and he nurtured his interest in fashion alongside other artistic pursuits.

“I wanted to improve my arrangement and play by ear,” McLaurin said. “I was missing something in just playing other people’s music and the standard classical repertoire was that I didn’t feel like I was creating enough. I didn’t feel like something was completely mine. I wanted more of a creative outlet. It helped me discover more in music and I think it helped me to like the traditional repertoire more – I played it because I wanted to play this music, not because it was my only choice.

In addition to Rachmaninoff, ISO will create a new work by local composer Roger Zare entitled “Fanfare Solaris”. Zare is a fellow of the Illinois State University School of Music. Lam’s connection with Zare goes back far beyond their time together at Bloomington-Normal.

“We were at Peabody when Roger was an undergrad, so I’ve known him for a very long time,” Lam said. “It’s wonderful to have him at Bloomington-Normal. I like his music. It’s very accessible, so no one is going to be afraid, but it’s also very well designed.

Dimitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9 concludes the program. The Illinois Symphony performs at the Bloomington Center for the Performing Arts at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 7. For tickets and more information, visit Ilsymphony.org.

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Jessie Montgomery, CSO Mead Composer in Residence https://allanpettersson.org/jessie-montgomery-cso-mead-composer-in-residence/ https://allanpettersson.org/jessie-montgomery-cso-mead-composer-in-residence/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/jessie-montgomery-cso-mead-composer-in-residence/ [ad_1] In April, violinist and composer Jessie Montgomery was named the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s new composer-in-residence. Montgomery will split her time between New York and Chicago throughout her residency, which began July 1 and ends June 30, 2024. She gave this interview while in town preparing for the first concert for the 2021 season -2022 […]]]>


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In April, violinist and composer Jessie Montgomery was named the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s new composer-in-residence. Montgomery will split her time between New York and Chicago throughout her residency, which began July 1 and ends June 30, 2024. She gave this interview while in town preparing for the first concert for the 2021 season -2022 MusicNOW from CSO, Back home, which takes place on Monday November 1st.

As said to Jamie Ludwig

I am currently in Chicago. We had a preview concert yesterday during the Ear Taxi Festival, which is a big new music festival in town and a partner of CSO. The preview included a piece of mine called Lunar songs, which is a piece for voice and string quartet. It was wonderful getting to know Ear Taxi. There was really a constant flow of audience members which was great. Before that, we had a few days of rehearsal, and I got to know some of the musicians at CSO, which was great. I also met Maestro Muti, and I went to a show at the CSO this weekend. The welcome was therefore extremely warm, with truly wonderful activities.

I’m really excited to see how it all comes together. We were previewing the November 1 concert, which will include Lunar songs and another piece of mine called Loisaïda, my love. Both will be sung by Whitney Morrison. I am really excited about this debut program as it includes a commission from one of my colleagues at Princeton, a fabulous and very promising young composer, Elijah Daniel Smith [Scions of an Atlas]. And we’ll have a Ted Hearne track [Authority] and a play by Nathalie Joachim [Seen], who is a great friend of mine. I’m just delighted to be able to start working with them and Michael Lewanski, who will be conducting the concert.

CSO MusicNOW: Homecoming
This program, organized by Jessie Montgomery, includes two of her compositions, Lunar songs and Loisaïda, my love, alongside plays by Ted Hearne, Elijah Daniel Smith and Nathalie Joachim. Mon 11/1, 7:00 p.m., Orchestra Hall, Symphony Center, 220 S. Michigan, $ 20, all ages

Most of my interactions with Chicago, until about a year ago, were with the Sphinx Organization, as we used to come here every summer to do a concert at the Harris. [Editor’s note: Montgomery has been affiliated since 1999 with this Detroit-based nonprofit supporting young Black and Latinx classical musicians.] As part of the Sphinx Performance Academy, we were in residence with Roosevelt University and Northwestern University at various times during our summer program. In those cases, we were kind of in our little bubble teaching our kids, and we were taking them to Grant Park as part of our summer apprenticeship, and we got to see all of these great performances from Grant Park. One of my former students showed up at the Ear Taxi Festival, so the circle has come full circle.

As for the new music scene in the city, my first introduction was through MusicNOW a few years ago, when Missy Mazzoli invited me to participate. There is also Fulcrum Point, and I have colleagues in a very good string quartet called D-Composed. So I slowly put all the pieces together and find out how everyone is connected. It’s really impressive how much activity there is here around new music and classical music. I feel like they all live in the same space – when I think of classical music, I automatically think of how it is connected to new music. I think the CSO does a great job of making that connection, and I hope to make it even stronger.

Part of the goal is certainly to help attract other types of audiences. We have a partnership with Poems While You Wait, an organization that does spontaneous poems at public events, which I hope will be of interest to some literary audiences. I also have some ideas for bringing in performers who have a more pop lean but who also work with orchestral instruments, and I hope that will bring a more mixed audience. There is now a lot of overlap between classical music and pop music, when it comes to how classical composers think about their work. Because I think there is an immediacy that people are looking for with music, so hopefully that will generate more integration with different audiences. I’m also actively looking for composers to integrate who work in digital media and other fields, like R&B, jazz, alternative rock bands and stuff like that.

In the United States, cultural identity has become a major discussion, and I think it’s really useful and necessary so that we can create a little more balance in terms of representation and voice. In my curation for this MusicNOW concert, three of the four composers on the program have Afro-Diasporic origins. My approach is really to include intentional people, but for the composers themselves, it’s about the opportunity to present their music. Whether composers bring their identity to the fore as a core element of their music is up to them, but the portrayal of who is on stage is what I focus on. I just want concerts to reflect so many unique and individual voices – and diverse [as possible]. Now that I have a platform to showcase these composers, I’m super excited to be able to complete this part of my mission.

Baritone Tyler Duncan and cellist Olivia Blander perform Jessie Montgomery Loisaïda, my love at the Chan Center for the Performing Arts in Vancouver, British Columbia, in August 2020.

One of the two songs I perform on November 1 is a tribute to Leonard Bernstein with a poem written by J. Mae Barizo, who is a wonderful poet based in New York. The other song, Loisaïda, my love, is based on a poem by Puerto Rican activist, Bimbo Rivas, who was very active in community development in the late 1970s and 1980s in New York City. When it comes to my own cultural identity, I have many different ways, but one of them is definitely saying, “I’m a New Yorker.” I’m a New Yorker in Chicago, and so, bringing this with me, I’m very proud of it. The poem is about recognizing that although there are many difficulties and trials in the community, through love and action we can remedy them. It’s a piece that I really identify with, and I think it has a universal message.

I’m really excited to get to know the city and get to know all the artists here. And just keep making strong connections for myself and hopefully the CSO.

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Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra to present a composition by young composer Marietta https://allanpettersson.org/georgia-youth-symphony-orchestra-to-present-a-composition-by-young-composer-marietta/ https://allanpettersson.org/georgia-youth-symphony-orchestra-to-present-a-composition-by-young-composer-marietta/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 18:04:59 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/georgia-youth-symphony-orchestra-to-present-a-composition-by-young-composer-marietta/ [ad_1] The Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra will create a composition by Marietta’s teenage composer Will Weaver. The concert will take place on October 17, 2021 at the Bailey Center for the Performing Arts at Kennesaw State University. For more information, read the full event press release, reprinted below: Georgia Youth Symphony to present the first […]]]>


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The Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra will create a composition by Marietta’s teenage composer Will Weaver.

The concert will take place on October 17, 2021 at the Bailey Center for the Performing Arts at Kennesaw State University.

For more information, read the full event press release, reprinted below:

Georgia Youth Symphony to present the first orchestral suite Fire by a promising young composer

(Marietta, GA, October 13, 2021) Marietta’s teenager Will Weaver is poised to be a part of the next generation of classical music composers. On October 17, 2021, the Georgia Youth Symphony Orchestra will perform one of their original compositions at the Bailey Center for the Performing Arts at Kennesaw State University.

Inspired by that of Vivaldi Four Seasons, Weaver composed the Orchestral Suite in B minor, Opus Two, Fire, in 2020. The GYSO Philharmonic Orchestra will perform the first movement, which represents a lightning fire. Movements two and three invoke images of a happy fire in a fireplace, then a raging forest fire.

Weaver has been a member of GYSO since 2018 and currently plays viola with the GYSO Symphony and the Honors String Quartet. He is in his second year at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School in Atlanta, where he also plays violin for the HIES Upper School Orchestra.

At the end of the final season of GYSO, Weaver told Philharmonic Orchestra director Kelly Thomas that he was working on orchestral compositions and asked for his opinion. “When Will sent me the orchestral suite for FireI was more than impressed, ”said Thomas. This led her to ask Weaver for permission to create the sequel’s first movement this season. “It was a pleasure to see him evolve as a composer through different drafts to meet the specific needs of the orchestra and it was a source of inspiration for me and for the other students of GYSO”, he said. she declared.

As a composer, Weaver focuses on writing contemporary classical works for orchestras and chamber groups. He also enjoys arranging music for video games and other forms of digital media. Also in 2020, another of his compositions, Two Rondos for Piano Trio, received top honors in a Georgia Music Educators Association competition.

Founded in 2006, GYSO is the largest youth orchestra program in the Southeast and one of the 10 largest such programs by enrollment in the United States. For more information visit georgiayouthsymphony.org.

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