long time – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 09:10:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png long time – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 Premiere of the Double Concerto for violin and percussion by the Finnish composer https://allanpettersson.org/premiere-of-the-double-concerto-for-violin-and-percussion-by-the-finnish-composer/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 23:16:21 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/premiere-of-the-double-concerto-for-violin-and-percussion-by-the-finnish-composer/ (Photo credit: Ghadi Boustani) Finland Lahti Symphony Orchestra will be the first Kalevi AhoConcerto for viola, percussion and orchestra. Will be held at Sibelius House concert hall in the evening, this double concerto will be conducted by the principal guest conductor of the Lahti Symphony Anja Bihlmaierwith Hiyoli Togawa on the alto, and Alexej Gerassimez […]]]>
(Photo credit: Ghadi Boustani)

Finland Lahti Symphony Orchestra will be the first Kalevi AhoConcerto for viola, percussion and orchestra.

Will be held at Sibelius House concert hall in the evening, this double concerto will be conducted by the principal guest conductor of the Lahti Symphony Anja Bihlmaierwith Hiyoli Togawa on the alto, and Alexej Gerassimez to percussion.

This premiere will be followed by Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9 on the concert program. A long-time contributor to the Lahti Symphony Orchestra, Aho was named composer-in-residence in 1992 and became an honorary composer in 2011.

“[It is] always a landmark when a new work of art emerges,” the Lahti Symphony wrote on its website. “Kalevi Aho’s solo concerts will continue today with a rare ensemble — when viola and percussion [meets] in an explosive combination.

To buy tickets for the concert, click on here.

This double concerto is one of four new concertos by Aho receiving premieres between February and March 2022.

In addition to the creation of his double concerto for viola and percussion, the Piccolo Clarinet Concerto d’Aho Simplicus simplicismus will be created by Kuopio City Orchestra. This will be followed by The Helsinki Philharmonic creation of his Concerto for flute, harp and orchestra; and his Concerto for Alto Flute and Strings will be premiered in Skopje, Macedonia.

Born in 1949, Aho started learning music at the age of 10. He studied violin and composition at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki with Einojuhani Rautavaara and with Boris Blacher at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in Germany.

Between 1974 and 1988 he taught musicology at the University of Helsinki, and from 1988 to 1993 he was professor of composition at the Sibelius Academy. From 1993, he became an independent composer.

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“I seek longevity in my songs, not instant gratification” https://allanpettersson.org/i-seek-longevity-in-my-songs-not-instant-gratification/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/i-seek-longevity-in-my-songs-not-instant-gratification/ Armaan Malik: “I seek longevity in my songs, not instant gratification” (Photo credit: Instagram) While singer Armaan Malik has received positive responses for his latest English single “You,” he says for a love song, he seeks its archival value more than instant gratification. Known for delivering several hit songs, both in films as a playback […]]]>
Armaan Malik: “I seek longevity in my songs, not instant gratification” (Photo credit: Instagram)

While singer Armaan Malik has received positive responses for his latest English single “You,” he says for a love song, he seeks its archival value more than instant gratification.

Known for delivering several hit songs, both in films as a playback singer and in several music videos as an independent artist, Armaan has managed to gain and maintain a solid following of fans over the past 15 years. years.

Armaan Malik told IANS: “There are two types of music that happen, one is these seasonal, party songs where we look forward to releasing such dance numbers so instantly these songs become the party anthem… here we are looking for quick pick up of these songs.

“But when it comes to my romantic songs, I’m looking for its archival value, its longevity, rather than instant gratification. For instant ‘You’ is a song I’ve been working on for 2 years. It’s a simple song love but every time you listen to it, I want my listener to fall in love all over again, it’s that feeling after listening to the song that I want to achieve as an artist.

Armaan Malik went on to add, “Such an impact takes a bit longer to come, but it lasts a long time. This is the kind of validation I expect from my fans.

The song ‘You’ is sung by Armaan. The lyrics are written by Jack Edwards, Natania Lalwani and Felicia Ferraro. The video for the song also featured Emma Declercq with Armaan.

Starting his career in music at the age of 10, Armaan Malik made his Bollywood debut singing with the song ‘Bum Bum Bhole’ in 2007 for the movie ‘Taare Zameen Par’.

Asked what he misses the most since he started gaining attention as a singer at a young age, Armaan replied, “Well, the popularity and recognition I have for my music are a blessing, so I have no problem all within the few restrictions that come with celebrity status. Yeah now I’m more comfortable with attention but earlier when I was just 20 or 21 when guys my age could do whatever they wanted I was just focusing on music and living a very disciplined life because honestly, I worship my music.

“I don’t know anything other than my music, that’s the most important thing. If there are little things I can’t afford to do…it would be shopping, eating out, etc. without being noticed. For example, I love to eat Gujarati thali. Whenever I had my live concert in Ahmedabad and posted that if I wanted to walk around, enter a little thali restaurant to eat and relax, people would be there…it makes me aware. I know they love me and the attention they give me but these are small joys sometimes restricted but that’s fine. I am comfortable with attention.

The song ‘You’ is available on YouTube and all streaming platforms.

Must Read: When Aamir Khan had a ‘bad experience’ working with Salman Khan and said ‘I just wanted to stay away from him’

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Cleveland Orchestra Focuses On Young Composer Bernd Richard Deutsch With World Premiere Of “Intensity” https://allanpettersson.org/cleveland-orchestra-focuses-on-young-composer-bernd-richard-deutsch-with-world-premiere-of-intensity/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/cleveland-orchestra-focuses-on-young-composer-bernd-richard-deutsch-with-world-premiere-of-intensity/ [ad_1] CLEVELAND, Ohio – Ever since living with a pandemic, Bernd Richard Deutsch has been waiting for this moment. He completed “Intensity,” a new piece for the Cleveland Orchestra and music director Franz Welser-Most, in March 2020, days before the world went out of business. Today, almost two years later, his work is finally about […]]]>


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CLEVELAND, Ohio – Ever since living with a pandemic, Bernd Richard Deutsch has been waiting for this moment.

He completed “Intensity,” a new piece for the Cleveland Orchestra and music director Franz Welser-Most, in March 2020, days before the world went out of business. Today, almost two years later, his work is finally about to receive its premiere.

“I’m very excited,” Deutsch said, via Zoom from his home in Vienna, Austria. “The question is always, ‘Will reality be like your imagination? We will see. Even with the best imagination, it’s never the same.

Deutsch has good reason to expect the unexpected. He knows better than anyone how the Cleveland Orchestra tends to exceed even the highest expectations. Indeed, this margin is the subject of this last work, the third of three pieces in a subscription program comprising Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 “Linz” and Dvorak’s Symphony No. 8.

One of the many things the title “Intensity” refers to is Deutsch’s reaction to the orchestra’s 2019 performance of their organ concerto, “Okeanos”, with organist Paul Jacobs. This experience was so profound for Deutsch that it left a permanent mark in his memory and planted the seed of what has become an 18-minute orchestral work, dedicated to Welser-Most.

“It was an intense feeling,” recalls Deutsch. “It was very moving. There was an imprint of that sound on me, and I tried to draw inspiration from that sound.

He didn’t have to put in too much effort, it seems.

Usually, for Deutsch, the Young Composer Fellow of the orchestra, composing is a slow and laborious process. The “intensity”, however, came relatively easily. Deutsch said he just sat down to write, and the main ideas for the music came up quickly, in a whirlwind well described by the title.

In the end, of course, he didn’t need to rush. The deadline he had worked under was soon overturned by the pandemic.

A few days after Deutsch finished “Intensity,” the May premiere he had anticipated was canceled and the Cleveland Orchestra, along with most of America’s arts organizations, died for an then indefinite period. He himself struggled to continue working and went into a kind of musical hibernation.

“There was a period of tension, and ‘Intensity’ reflected that, but then it all fell apart,” Deutsch said. “It all happened, but we didn’t know what was going to happen. It was like falling into the void. Emotionally, it was not very pleasant. Nothing happened for a long time.

This the period has no place in “Intensity”. Deutsch described the first and third movements of the work as frantic and charged, similarly occupied with one “situation” after another. Either way, he said, “it’s a bit like being on a train, looking out the window, watching the scenery change rapidly. “

The exception, said Deutsch, is the second movement. The longer, slower, and more overtly emotional part of the work is based on two rich chords, one of which, according to Deutsch, is derived from Mussorgsky’s “Images of an Exhibition”. Where the first and third movements are extroverted in nature, the second depicts an internal dynamic, an intensity focused inward.

“It’s like a tribute to [Welser-Most] and the orchestra, and maybe also a thank you for choosing me for the scholarship, ”Deutsch said of the piece.

As it turns out, the ‘Intensity’ premiere in 2020 wasn’t Deutsch’s only musical loss to the coronavirus or the composer’s only close contact with the pandemic.

Another piece scheduled to premiere in Amsterdam at the end of 2020 has been postponed to a later date at the art exhibition it was designed to accompany. Around the same time, too, Deutsch’s cello concerto received its world premiere in Vienna, but only under the most tense conditions, hours before the city closed. Even today, Deutsch said he was not sure that “Intensity”, a co-commission with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra, would ever be performed there, as originally planned.

But the horizon for Deutsch is far from bleak. Where most Young Composer Fellows only receive one commission from the Cleveland Orchestra, he’s already working on a second, large choral piece tentatively scheduled – in pencil, not ink – for 2024.

Meanwhile, Deutsch is crossing the Atlantic to help with rehearsals for “Intensity” and relish the performance he expected to see two years ago. The pleasure he feels now is twofold. He is happy both to see “Intensity” come to fruition and to go beyond.

“When a piece is finished, and I know it’s finished, it’s done,” Deutsch explained. “It’s time to close the case. You can no longer enter this specific energy.

PREVIEW

Cleveland Orchestra

What: Franz Welser-Most conducts Mozart, Dvorak and Deutsch

When: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday January 13 and 14; and 8 p.m. on Sunday January 15.

Or: Severance Music Center, 11001 Euclid Ave., Cleveland.

Tickets: $ 21 to $ 165. Visit clevelandorchestra.com or dial 216-231-1111.

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Taylor Swift Shades Exes Who Think ‘Red’ Songs Are About Them https://allanpettersson.org/taylor-swift-shades-exes-who-think-red-songs-are-about-them/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/taylor-swift-shades-exes-who-think-red-songs-are-about-them/ [ad_1] Taylor Swift. Matt Baron / BEI / Shutterstock A familiar story. Taylor Swift is in a very different place than she was when Red initially dropped in 2012 – and she doesn’t focus on what the exes behind her songs think about the new releases. “To be honest, I didn’t think about their experience,” […]]]>


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Taylor Swift. Matt Baron / BEI / Shutterstock

A familiar story. Taylor Swift is in a very different place than she was when Red initially dropped in 2012 – and she doesn’t focus on what the exes behind her songs think about the new releases.

“To be honest, I didn’t think about their experience,” Swift, 31, said during an appearance on Late night with Seth Meyers Thursday, November 11, one day before the release of the reissue.

For the songwriter, reliving the experience the second time around is “really the way to do it”, compared to the heartache that inspired the original record.

“[I was] very sad. … But this time, I have sunglasses and a mojito, and it’s cold this time, ”she noted. “It’s really nice to be able to release this album and not be sad. Don’t take a break between interviews to cry. I’m telling you, it’s much better this way.

The fan favorite album features the breakup anthems “All Too Well” and “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together”, the lyrics of which hint at Swift’s whirlwind relationship with Jake gyllenhaal. The duo dated for three months in 2010 and the Miss American released star Red two years later.

“It originally came out about ten years ago, and I was 22, and this week of release has been so stressful because no one heard the music,” said Swift, who is releasing. with him. Joe alwyn since 2017, recalled Thursday. “There are, like, 14 different genres on this album. It is a real patchwork of genre. I was really experimenting.

The Pennsylvania native released the updated version of Red – with 30 tracks – on Friday, November 12.

Most of the lyrics evoked Swift and Gyllenhaal’s past romance with lyrics that said, “And I was thinking about the descent / Anytime he’s gonna say it’s love / You never called him like it was / Until we were dead and gone and buried / Check the pulse and come back / Swearing it’s the same / After three months in the grave.

In addition to the highly anticipated 10-minute rendition of “All Too Well,” Swift will unveil a short film starring Sadie sink and Dylan o’brien based on the song. Ahead of her release, Swift sprang from the collaborative atmosphere she fostered while directing the two lead roles.

“Sadie Sink and Dylan O’Brien were incredible actors in this short film and they couldn’t have blown me away any more,” the performer said on the Tonight’s Show with Jimmy Fallon Thursday. “It was the most amazing experience working with people who are so prepared, engaged and the chemistry between them is just on another planet.”

Swift has hinted that her fans aren’t ready for what lies ahead – and revealed there was even a specific section of the video that took her by surprise.

“They were so electric and [improvising] a lot of what they were doing we couldn’t take the camera away from them. We couldn’t cut. We couldn’t edit, ”she said. “So there was a really long shot with a camera that lasts a very long time and when you look at that you don’t know. You don’t realize it because they are so magnetic. They really are.

Ahead of the premiere of the short, eagle-eyed Swifties was quick to point out that Sink, 19, and O’Brien, 30, were in the same age range as Swift and Gyllenhaal, 40. , would have been during their brief romance. Fans even noticed that the Teen wolf The alum outfit is eerily similar to the one Gyllenhaal wore in 2010 when he was pictured with Swift.

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Composer Elijah Daniel Smith Comes Home for Chicago Symphony Orchestra Premiere: ‘A Dream Come True’ https://allanpettersson.org/composer-elijah-daniel-smith-comes-home-for-chicago-symphony-orchestra-premiere-a-dream-come-true/ https://allanpettersson.org/composer-elijah-daniel-smith-comes-home-for-chicago-symphony-orchestra-premiere-a-dream-come-true/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 12:40:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-elijah-daniel-smith-comes-home-for-chicago-symphony-orchestra-premiere-a-dream-come-true/ [ad_1] CHICAGO – Elijah Daniel Smith grew up with music in town, going to concerts at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and studying classical music at the Chicago High School for the Arts. Today, the composer premieres an original piece in his hometown, opening the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s MusicNOW: Homecoming concert on Monday. “Scions of an […]]]>


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CHICAGO – Elijah Daniel Smith grew up with music in town, going to concerts at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and studying classical music at the Chicago High School for the Arts.

Today, the composer premieres an original piece in his hometown, opening the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s MusicNOW: Homecoming concert on Monday.

“Scions of an Atlas”, a 21st century interpretation of a baroque concerto-grosso performed by an ensemble of 13 musicians, has been commissioned by the orchestra to launch its 2021-22 season. Other composers with ties to Chicago will perform music on Monday, including Ted Hearne, Nathalie Joachim and Jessie Montgomery, who begins a three-year term as composer-in-residence with the Mead Orchestra this season.

It will be a rare opportunity for Smith to debut a play in Chicago, and in front of his family, friends and teachers who have supported his career.

“It wasn’t just me who was working hard to start my career,” Smith said. “It was my parents who sacrificed themselves to do this, my friends who decided they would help out when I needed it, my teachers, etc. So having this opportunity to bring him home is truly a dream come true. “

Become a composer

Smith grew up in Albany Park. His mother briefly studied piano in college and put Smith and his sister to school when they were children. He fell in love with music at the age of 10 and his sister introduced him to the metal band Trivium.

“It was the first moment, kind of a musical epiphany moment, that I had where I realized that I immediately fell in love with the music,” Smith said. “And this is kind of the first time I’ve been like, ‘This is what I want to do.'”

Credit: Provided
‘Chicago High School of the Arts.

With encouragement from his mother, Smith was accepted into the classical music program at Chicago High School for the Arts in Humboldt Park in the middle of the school year. He enrolled when he couldn’t read music at the time, which meant he embarked on crash courses in music theory and history to catch up.

After the initial culture shock, Smith fell in love with school and decided to take classical music seriously, he said.

“The mentorship from the faculty there really made a big difference,” said Smith. “I had teachers who really made me feel that if I wanted to do this, it was something I could do.”

Tina Boyer Brown, Artistic Director and Head of the Creative Writing Department at ChiArts, was a founding member of the school when it opened in 2009. Brown was Smith’s English teacher during his first year – and she is not surprised at his success.

” It is exciting. And really that he’s focusing on music in a new way and that he’s a composer to be featured. And half of his work produced by the [Chicago Symphony Orchestra] is so exciting to find, to see our students making their way, both intellectually and creatively in the world, ”said Brown.

Credit: Provided
Hallway murals at the Chicago School for the Arts.

Smith, a black man, said ChiArts has reinforced the importance of keeping the arts accessible to everyone.

“I think for a long time the term ‘great arts’, which is a bit of a problematic term to begin with, but it was a term that was basically used deliberately to create barriers and to create the separation between art. made by white people – and then everyone else, ”Smith said. “I think it’s incredibly important to have a school like ChiArts accessible, because it allows children who may not have other opportunities or resources to work with to develop their interests and artistic abilities. gives them the opportunity to really go somewhere and improve their skills. this.”

Brown also thinks it’s important to keep schools like ChiArts accessible, especially in a career that can be expensive to pursue.

“Art is for everyone, right? ” she said. “Everyone should certainly have access to [it], and every child deserves a solid artistic education. At ChiArts, we are committed to students and we are committed to ensuring that, regardless of student access to art, education or courses or training before entering the school, you can access it.

Smith graduated from ChiArts vocal major in 2013; he has since turned to composition. He studied at the Boston Conservatory and earned a master’s degree from the Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins University. He is now studying composition at Princeton University, where he is also president.

Smith regularly composes pieces for instruments he cannot play himself, including flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet and more. It also works in electronic instruments and synthesizers to create a less traditional sound.

“Scions of an Atlas” presents several of these instruments. There are several sounds that sound at once and “crazy” notes from different instruments that Smith hopes play out like “the way people would use a map or an atlas before going on a trip,” he said. -he declares.

“There’s a lot of technical terminology being thrown around,” Smith said. “But I really want to stress that I hope that beyond anything else the piece is enjoyable as a piece of music. So I hope that people who go there don’t feel left out of anything, because I see a bunch of weird words on the page. And I hope they feel like it’s a room they can interact with and love.

Tickets for the Orchestra’s MusicNOW’s Homecoming concert on Monday are $ 20. They can be purchased on his website.

Composer Elijah Daniels Smith learned to read music at Chicago High School of the Arts.

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Agenda: Rousing Rachmaninoff and the local composer ‘s world premiere mark 2nd ISO concert of the season https://allanpettersson.org/agenda-rousing-rachmaninoff-and-the-local-composer-s-world-premiere-mark-2nd-iso-concert-of-the-season/ https://allanpettersson.org/agenda-rousing-rachmaninoff-and-the-local-composer-s-world-premiere-mark-2nd-iso-concert-of-the-season/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 16:33:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/agenda-rousing-rachmaninoff-and-the-local-composer-s-world-premiere-mark-2nd-iso-concert-of-the-season/ [ad_1] The Illinois Symphony Orchestra recently resumed its concerts and will be playing a dynamic program for its second concert of the season on November 7. have not experienced live music for over 18 months. “What we want to do is make sure our audience comes to the concert and leaves very happy,” Lam said. […]]]>


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The Illinois Symphony Orchestra recently resumed its concerts and will be playing a dynamic program for its second concert of the season on November 7. have not experienced live music for over 18 months.

“What we want to do is make sure our audience comes to the concert and leaves very happy,” Lam said. “One of the things I said when we planned this was, ‘Let’s have some really good songs. “Everyone loves Rachmaninoff. We did the third piano concerto, but we didn’t do the second.

This will be the work of pianist Micah McLaurin, who makes his debut with the Illinois Symphony Orchestra (ISO) with Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Piano Concerto No. 2”. McLaurin first met Lam in Charleston, North Carolina, McLaurin’s hometown. Lam conducts both the Illinois Symphony and the Charleston Symphony, and he invited the young pianist to perform with the latter orchestra.

“This is how we are going to know each other,” McLaurin said. “We played Mozart’s ‘Concerto No. 20 in D minor’ in 2017. It was the first time we had worked together. We didn’t want to go back to Charleston anymore; we wanted to go elsewhere.

While taking refuge in his home during the pandemic, McLaurin experimented with different musical genres such as jazz and pop, often mixing classical music with other forms. Social media was a big outlet during his forties, and he nurtured his interest in fashion alongside other artistic pursuits.

“I wanted to improve my arrangement and play by ear,” McLaurin said. “I was missing something in just playing other people’s music and the standard classical repertoire was that I didn’t feel like I was creating enough. I didn’t feel like something was completely mine. I wanted more of a creative outlet. It helped me discover more in music and I think it helped me to like the traditional repertoire more – I played it because I wanted to play this music, not because it was my only choice.

In addition to Rachmaninoff, ISO will create a new work by local composer Roger Zare entitled “Fanfare Solaris”. Zare is a fellow of the Illinois State University School of Music. Lam’s connection with Zare goes back far beyond their time together at Bloomington-Normal.

“We were at Peabody when Roger was an undergrad, so I’ve known him for a very long time,” Lam said. “It’s wonderful to have him at Bloomington-Normal. I like his music. It’s very accessible, so no one is going to be afraid, but it’s also very well designed.

Dimitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9 concludes the program. The Illinois Symphony performs at the Bloomington Center for the Performing Arts at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 7. For tickets and more information, visit Ilsymphony.org.

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Do you miss Messiaen? He’s the composer who saves the planet – Slipped DiscSlipped Disc https://allanpettersson.org/do-you-miss-messiaen-hes-the-composer-who-saves-the-planet-slipped-discslipped-disc/ https://allanpettersson.org/do-you-miss-messiaen-hes-the-composer-who-saves-the-planet-slipped-discslipped-disc/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 08:37:30 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/do-you-miss-messiaen-hes-the-composer-who-saves-the-planet-slipped-discslipped-disc/ [ad_1] Norman Lebrecht October 29, 2021 Alastair Macaulay talks about last night’s concert in the Philharmonia’s London series: Singing birds 2021.x.29 The Philharmonia Orchestra’s fall season title at the Royal Festival Hall, “Human / Nature: Music for a Precious Planet,” contains several ideas. One is ecological: music can evoke subjects that deserve to be saved […]]]>


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Norman Lebrecht

October 29, 2021

Alastair Macaulay talks about last night’s concert in the Philharmonia’s London series:

Singing birds 2021.x.29

The Philharmonia Orchestra’s fall season title at the Royal Festival Hall, “Human / Nature: Music for a Precious Planet,” contains several ideas. One is ecological: music can evoke subjects that deserve to be saved from an environmental disaster. Another is the idea that the tension (and / or harmony) between humans and nature can be the subject of works of art. (Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony arrives later in the series, on December 2.)

A third idea is even more fundamental: that music can express subjects other than itself. But can he? Stravinsky in his Autobiography declared: “For I consider that music is, by its very nature, essentially powerless to express anything, be it a feeling, an attitude of mind, a psychological mood, a phenomenon of nature. , etc. been an inherent property of music.

Even though we don’t agree with Stravinsky here, it is helpful to listen to music that expresses or addresses the physical order while primarily expressing the music itself. The concert on Thursday 28 at the Royal Festival Hall was devoted to twentieth century French music written during Stravinsky’s lifetime. Although his three works – Ravel’s Mirrors (1904-1904), Messiaen’s Awakening of the Birds (1953), Ravel’s Daphnis and Chloé Suite n ° 2 (1909-1912) – were all chosen because of their representations from the natural world, one could also hear how each was simply investigating music for its own good.

The conductor was Thomas Sondergard, replacing Pablo Heras-Casado; the pianist was Pierre-Laurent Aimard. Ravel’s Mirrors, a work he originally composed for solo piano, has five parts: the third and fourth were given in the orchestral arrangements he composed, but the other three – which he never orchestrated, although others have done so in her name – were performed by Aimard in their original piano versions. Whether he writes for piano or orchestra, this is Ravel the sound explorer, boldly tracing new acoustic possibilities, combinations, resonances.

In Noctuelles, the first of Mirrors, Aimard immediately captivates with clusters of semi-melodic notes, often high and rapid, interspersed with descending staccato; and in Sad Birds he made the insistent repetition of small notes fascinating. Yes, we hear the butterfly in the Noctuids and the bird in the Sad Birds, but it’s not really this evocative side of the music that is the most interesting here.

How good it is to hear Ravel the experimenter: Aimard plays the piano like a scientist in a laboratory. The same was true when Sondergard conducted A Barque on the Ocean and Alborado del gracioso, the Third and Fourth Mirrors, though Ravel’s brilliant mastery of orchestral tones fell far short of the pianistic sound. When Aimard closes the suite with La Vallée des cloches, the astonishing tinkling of the music certainly says what they say about the bells, but what is most radical here is the persistence of sustained chords (so that the piano becomes its own echo chamber), the repetition of tiny sub-phrases, and the poetic control of diminundi (fade effects).

Messiaen is a composer who divides even among the followers of advanced musical modernism. The critic Charles Rosen called his scores “Saint Francis walking on the birds”; Yet I remember a glorious concert of his organ music after which a young American exclaimed in rapture, “Gee, to think I spent all that money on drugs when I could have had the same.” experience with Messiaen ”. As a representation of birdsong, his Réveil, despite a wealth of detail, is only intermittently captivating. As a pure musical form, however, Aimard and Sondergard made it fascinating, especially in passages of greater rhythmic multiplicity (where the individual avian voices merge into the polyphony).

The concert ended with the second suite of Daphnis by Ravel. Although many of us know it as long-time friends, it is full of musical miracles whose brilliance and meaning are revealed differently over the course of successive listenings. With the Philharmonia and the Sondergard, it became a study in both time and timelessness: Ravel sometimes flooded the senses while apparently stopping the pulse, but in other sequences nature itself seemed be a giant heartbeat.

In perhaps the most sublime paradox of the score, the strings gently play metric pizzicati, while the melodic line of the flute solo still pours out – like a bird song – with no obvious yardstick. We become aware of both time and its suspension, of the world and of the soul.

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Seasoned Artist and Composer Stefan Kristinkov’s EP “Clarinet Vibe” Offers Unforgettable Experience https://allanpettersson.org/seasoned-artist-and-composer-stefan-kristinkovs-ep-clarinet-vibe-offers-unforgettable-experience/ https://allanpettersson.org/seasoned-artist-and-composer-stefan-kristinkovs-ep-clarinet-vibe-offers-unforgettable-experience/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:17:27 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/seasoned-artist-and-composer-stefan-kristinkovs-ep-clarinet-vibe-offers-unforgettable-experience/ [ad_1] Renowned New York instrumental genius and composer Stefan Kristinkov created a reverie of blissful acoustic experience with his EP, “Clarinet vibe”. New York-based music composer Stefan Kristinkov continues to fascinate music lovers with his second solo project, ‘Clarinet atmosphere‘. Released on September 28, the album has already captured the hearts of listeners with its […]]]>


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Renowned New York instrumental genius and composer Stefan Kristinkov created a reverie of blissful acoustic experience with his EP, “Clarinet vibe”.

New York-based music composer Stefan Kristinkov continues to fascinate music lovers with his second solo project, Clarinet atmosphere. Released on September 28, the album has already captured the hearts of listeners with its versatile and versatile resonance. The 5-track album opens with a calming number, “Nothing to See”. It features a smooth jazzy flow that effortlessly weaves its way through your mind. The beautiful drum beats add a new and vibrant element to the track forming a brilliant symphony. Audiences are sure to get lost in the dreamy melodic flow of tracks like “Summer Forest”, “Smooth Ride”, “Last of a Kind”, and more.

The gifted artist is well known for having worked in independent films as a clarinetist. He has experience of many international performances and he uses this experience in his solo musical creations. Stefan Kristinkov always experimenting with different melodic elements and instrumental styles to form a soundscape different from others. He used a clarinet, vibraphone, bass guitar, and drums to create the incredible melodies of his latest work, “Clarinet vibe”. The exceptional sound and texture of the songs stay in the mind for a long time. Listen to it on Spotify and follow him on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for more updates.

Check out the album on Spotify:

https://open.spotify.com/album/69tUD3XmmvS7SBldn4f5Oi


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Pianist and composer Conrad Tao performs at Meany Hall in October https://allanpettersson.org/pianist-and-composer-conrad-tao-performs-at-meany-hall-in-october/ https://allanpettersson.org/pianist-and-composer-conrad-tao-performs-at-meany-hall-in-october/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 16:40:54 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/pianist-and-composer-conrad-tao-performs-at-meany-hall-in-october/ [ad_1] Conrad Tao. Photo by Brantley Gutierrez. New York magazine described pianist and composer Conrad Tao as “the kind of musician who shapes the future of classical music”. He previously performed with the Seattle Symphony, but October 13, Tao will make his Meany Hall debut at the Meany Hall Center for the Performing Arts on […]]]>


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Conrad Tao. Photo by Brantley Gutierrez.

New York magazine described pianist and composer Conrad Tao as “the kind of musician who shapes the future of classical music”. He previously performed with the Seattle Symphony, but October 13, Tao will make his Meany Hall debut at the Meany Hall Center for the Performing Arts on the Seattle campus of the University of Washington.

Tao’s program includes Beethoven, as well as a play by Felipe Lara entitled Fair tones (#BlackLivesMatter), and a new composition by Tao himself which was commissioned by Meany Center and Celebrity Series in Boston. Tao had presented the official world premiere of Lara’s piece at the Aspen Music Festival on July 8, 2017 and will now share it with audiences in Seattle.

Tao reports that he built the six-piece Meany Hall program based on a musical arc he imagined. “By Beethoven Storm Sonata has been in my hands for a few years, and I knew I wanted her to be the center of a program, and I knew I wanted to bring out the sonic experimentation that is evident throughout the piece ”, Tao said. “And I also wanted to find a way to structure a program around two alternative versions of Ruth Crawford Seeger. Piano study in mixed accents, with their opposite dynamic trajectories.

Music has been a long-standing pursuit for Tao. “As far back as my memory goes, I was already engaged in music,” he recalls. “My first memories are more social than anything else, the friend of the family who offered to give me lessons for free when no one else was ready to work with a three-year-old, the pleasures Suzuki group violin lessons with a wonderful community music teacher. “

Sounds and notes were mysteries Tao felt compelled to explore. “I started attending Chicago Symphony Orchestra concerts with my parents when I was six years old, and I remember two concerts vividly: Mitsuko Uchida playing Ravel Piano Concerto in G major with Pierre Boulez conducting in 2001, and Ute Lemper singing Brecht and Weill’s The seven deadly sins with Markus Stenz at the helm in 2000, ”said Tao. “The Ravel struck me right away. I remember coming home and trying to figure out what the chromatic piano triplets were like in the overture, I remember being fascinated by the blue notes and the notes borrowed from jazz all through. along the room.

The draw for the composition also came early. “I remember improvising on the piano with a mini-disc player recording,” Tao said. “I remember writing my first melody, titling it Congratulations, which was misspelled.

The piano was Tao’s first instrument. “We had an old brown Baldwin standing in the Urbana house where I was born,” he said. “According to my parents, when I was 18 months old, I sort of sat on the bench and started picking out the kindergarten tunes that were playing in my room at the time. They still got a VHS tape of me tripping over Mary had a little lamb around this time.

During his musical training, Tao learned several keys to good musicality. “The most important things I learned in my training as a pianist were, from Emilio del Rosario at the Chicago Institute of Music, don’t fight the piano, because the piano will always win,” Tao said. “From Yoheved Kaplinsky to Juilliard in New York, I learned to listen to a piece on a macro scale, and above all, to build an ergonomic technique, which does not fight your body.

Tao also praises his composition teachers. “From Chris Theofanidis, I learned to develop motivational guidelines and refine my songwriting instincts,” he recalls. “Perhaps Chris’ greatest contribution to my life has been introducing me to contemporary concert music in listening sessions from the age of 10. These sessions revealed just how great he is. there was to explore. “

For years, Tao played at a breakneck pace, until the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and he was forced to submit his work online. “COVID’s initial lockdown period pushed me inward,” he said. “I spent a lot of time working on my improvisation practice as a pianist.”

Tao began to step out of his main medium. “I liked thinking about the video container,” he said. “I have started to develop a composition practice with video which I look forward to continuing to explore in the future.”

He also unexpectedly picked up a pen. “I wrote an essay on house music and harmonic form,” he said. “All of these developments probably wouldn’t have happened if my usual pace of work hadn’t completely stopped.”

Throughout his career, Tao says his main challenge has been to trust his voice. “I’ve learned over the years that when I have a deep fear about a new job or program, often in the form of ‘can I do that? “Can I really get away with this?” “He explained,” it’s a sign that I’m on the right track, a difficult, scary, and generally revealing path. “

This is the kind of path that Tao is taking with his new composition which will be presented in October. “I’ve been wondering for a long time whether or not it’s possible to play the harmonic series up and down on one key,” he mused. “I am interested in the phrasing made perceptible by this targeted listening.

It is a continuation of the exploration of the mysteries that propelled Tao into his childhood. “I’m interested in the fundamental piano paradoxes that this opens up,” he said. “I’m interested in what this means for the meeting point, or the meeting plane, where the attack speed is determined, where a line is perceived, where sound and trace, sound and resonance meet. . “

Tao describes all of this as the inner world of the musical key. “My goal is for the new composition to explore this possibility and its implications,” he said.

This goal seems to be just the current one among many to come. “I hope to make music with the ability to touch the way someone listens, music that expresses my point of view and invites others to participate,” he said. “And I hope to continue to do so for the rest of my life.”

Conrad Tao performs on October 13 at the Meany Hall Center for the Performing Arts, University of Washington, Seattle.

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Well done and bis: the Armenian State Symphony Orchestra and the famous violinist Sergey Khachatryan perform at the Dubai Opera – Panorama https://allanpettersson.org/well-done-and-bis-the-armenian-state-symphony-orchestra-and-the-famous-violinist-sergey-khachatryan-perform-at-the-dubai-opera-panorama/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/well-done-and-bis-the-armenian-state-symphony-orchestra-and-the-famous-violinist-sergey-khachatryan-perform-at-the-dubai-opera-panorama/ [ad_1] The air was filled with the sounds of high-quality Armenian music at the Dubai Opera on September 5th. The Armenian State Symphony Orchestra (ASSO), led by its artistic director and principal conductor Sergey Smbatyan, and world-renowned violinist Sergey Khachatryan brilliantly performed the Violin Concerto by renowned Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian in the luxurious Dubai […]]]>


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The air was filled with the sounds of high-quality Armenian music at the Dubai Opera on September 5th. The Armenian State Symphony Orchestra (ASSO), led by its artistic director and principal conductor Sergey Smbatyan, and world-renowned violinist Sergey Khachatryan brilliantly performed the Violin Concerto by renowned Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian in the luxurious Dubai Opera .

The performance drew cries of “Bravo! ” public. For a long time, the foreign audience did not allow the soloist and the conductor to leave the stage. In response to the applause, Sergey Khachatryan performed “Havun, Havun” by Gregory of Narek, filling the Dubai Opera with medieval Armenian melodies.

Aram Khachaturian wrote the concerto in 1940. It has been performed on various stages around the world, being highly regarded by the public.

Speaking to Panorama.am, Sergey Khachatryan, also thanks to whom Armenia and Armenian culture are known, confessed that he loved the Khachaturian Violin Concerto and that he had performed the composition in different countries of the world. .

“I am glad that we can participate in such an international festival with the Armenian State Symphony Orchestra today also and present the masterpieces of Armenian composers to a foreign audience,” he said.

When asked if the nationality of a musician performing the Khachaturian Violin Concerto made a difference, the violinist replied that there was probably a difference, perhaps adding that Armenians, knowing Armenian music and carrying it in their genes, interpret it differently.

“If you grew up listening to Armenian classical music, you are familiar with national music, you have these elements of folk music in your mind, you understand it better, but of course foreigners can also perform the concerto with brio, ”Khachatryan said.

Referring to other programs, the violinist said that there were no specific concerts planned yet, but that he planned to come to Armenia by the end of the year to perform for amateurs. of art. Sergey Khachatryan has not disclosed any other plans, claiming they are still on his mind and have yet to materialize.

Sergey Smbatyan in turn said that the orchestra has performed at the Dubai Opera on several occasions. “A long awaited concert with Sergey Khachatryan took place in Dubai. We have played a lot here, every concert is unique and this concert is no exception,” he said.

Speaking about the InClassica festival, Sergey Smbatyan said that it is one of the biggest musical events, adding that participation in such festival is a great achievement for the orchestra.

“I think participating in such an international festival is a success. The orchestras that perform at the festival are among the top 20 symphony orchestras in the world and, I think, it is a great achievement for the Armenian State Symphony Orchestra. to perform here with them, ”Smbatyan said.

In addition to participating in the festival, participants of the final stages of the International Piano Competition “Classical Piano” organized within the framework of the InClassica Festival shared the stage with ASSO, which, according to its manager, was a responsible task.

Note that Sergey Smbatyan will conduct 10 concerts with other orchestras and soloists as part of the InClassica Festival.

Note, the concert of the Armenian State Symphony Orchestra and Sergey Khachatryan took place as part of the 10th InClassica International Music Festival in Dubai. The special 10th anniversary edition of the festival is organized by the European Foundation for the Support of Culture (EUFSC) in partnership with the SAMIT Event Group.

The event’s composer-in-residence is Alexey Shor. The festival brought together 37 exceptional musicians, 7 renowned orchestras and 12 renowned conductors. The international music festival InClassica runs until September 26.

Photos by Panorama.am and Alexei Molchanovsky.

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