Symphonic composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:05:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Symphonic composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 A Garden of Earthly Delights: the virtual platform honoring the legacy of composer Krzysztof Penderecki https://allanpettersson.org/a-garden-of-earthly-delights-the-virtual-platform-honoring-the-legacy-of-composer-krzysztof-penderecki/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 15:13:18 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/a-garden-of-earthly-delights-the-virtual-platform-honoring-the-legacy-of-composer-krzysztof-penderecki/ When Krzysztof Penderecki passed away in March 2020, the Polish composer left behind not only some of the most exciting, atmospheric and daringly inventive music of the past half century, but also a remarkable garden – located about 100 km from Krakow, the Penderecki’s arboretum covers 62 acres and contains 1,700 different species of trees. […]]]>

When Krzysztof Penderecki passed away in March 2020, the Polish composer left behind not only some of the most exciting, atmospheric and daringly inventive music of the past half century, but also a remarkable garden – located about 100 km from Krakow, the Penderecki’s arboretum covers 62 acres and contains 1,700 different species of trees. “I am walking in my garden and I am happy,” he said in 2019. “I go over there, to the big trees, and I put my arms around one of them for a moment. It’s a hug that gives me a feeling of power and peace.

So what better way to celebrate the life of the great man than with an online virtual garden? Penderecki’s garden is a wonderfully inventive and interactive way to explore the composer’s universe, his love of flora and, of course, his music.

The garden is an original idea of ​​the Adam Mickiewicz Institute, the organization created in 2000 to promote Polish culture in an inventive and inspiring way. In addition to celebrating great Polish artists through the past and marking major anniversaries, the Institute also defends the brilliant talent of today, whether they are dazzling jazz musicians or the exciting scene of ‘avant-garde. And as one of Poland’s biggest music exports, Penderecki is of course at the heart of the Institute’s work.

In Penderecki’s Garden you will not only find guides to a number of his masterpieces, you will also learn about the tree species found in Krzysztof Penderecki’s beautiful garden in Lusławice, Poland. The Adam Mickiewicz Institute he also leads other initiatives that have been inspired by his life and work. These include the recent release of a limited edition vinyl, its 1964 Painters from Gdansk, accompanied by short works by three contemporary Polish composers. Although the vinyl itself is not available for purchase, you can still check out the wonderful playlist on the Culture.pl Soundcloud page here.

To accompany the website, the Institute also planted memorial trees in selected locations around the world, each bearing a plaque bearing Penderecki’s name. In cooperation with Polish Embassies and Polish Institutes, trees were already planted earlier this year in Brussels, Ottawa, Kaunas, Leipzig and Singapore, and by the end of 2021 there will also be one in Bangkok!

The tree in Singapore was planted on November 23, marking what would have been Penderecki’s 88th birthday. The same day also saw the launch of the “Garden of Memory” section on the Penderecki Garden website, where fans of the composer and his music can share their memories and appreciation. A new podcast series has also been launched here.

Penderecki_04 Garden (2)

It is therefore time to enter the Garden of Penderecki. There you will find a guide to a number of its many trees. And, while you enjoy your virtual walk, here are five of the masterpieces you’ll hear along the way …

The best pieces of music from Krzysztof Penderecki

Symphony No. 8, “Songs of Transience”

Written for soloists, choir and orchestra, Penderecki’s Eighth Symphony is dedicated, yes, to trees! Composed of 12 short movements with titles such as “By a lime tree”, “Am I telling you, beloved trees? And “O Green Tree of Life”, this often powerful 35-minute work showcases the composer’s talent at composing for vocals.

Stabat Mater

Only seven minutes long, Penderecki’s 1962 work for unaccompanied choir has an extraordinary impact in its short duration. Depicting the scene of the Virgin Mary at the cross, the play begins with grouped voices in a mysteriously disturbing fashion before finally erupting into a glorious finale. An essential introduction to the sacred music of Penderecki.

Concerto for horn, ‘Winterreise’

Another work inspired by trees, in this case the forests that Penderecki remembered when he was young. With a title meaning “Winter Journey”, this magnificent 2007 work for horn and orchestra takes us deep into the woods with moments of awe-filled mystery mingled with thrilling passages as we race on horseback, the sound bugle in our ears.

The passion of Saint Luke

Composed in the 1960s, Penderecki’s epic work for three solo voices, narrator, three choirs, boy’s choir and orchestra is extremely dramatic. Its power comes in part from a daring mix of styles, from avant-garde to its nods to the traditions of JS Bach and Palestrina from the Baroque and Renaissance eras.

Violin Concerto No.1

Created by the great Isaac Stern in 1976, the First Violin Concerto marks a turning point towards an almost modernist style. Frequently recalling Bartók’s music, Penderecki inserts captivating musical effects alongside a plaintive and soaring solo violin part.


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Meet the young composer whose piece for Seattle Symphony is among the first to be inspired by the milestones of 2020 https://allanpettersson.org/meet-the-young-composer-whose-piece-for-seattle-symphony-is-among-the-first-to-be-inspired-by-the-milestones-of-2020/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/meet-the-young-composer-whose-piece-for-seattle-symphony-is-among-the-first-to-be-inspired-by-the-milestones-of-2020/ In general, the larger the artistic institution, the more slowly it is able to react to the times, and professional orchestras are no exception. This makes it all the more difficult for these institutions to present an art that reflects current events. But when the Seattle Symphony performs Joel Thompson’s “To Awaken the Sleeper” on […]]]>

In general, the larger the artistic institution, the more slowly it is able to react to the times, and professional orchestras are no exception. This makes it all the more difficult for these institutions to present an art that reflects current events. But when the Seattle Symphony performs Joel Thompson’s “To Awaken the Sleeper” on Thursday, December 2 and Saturday, December 4, it will perform a work on the crest of the first wave of orchestral pieces inspired by the COVID-19 crisis – and other events. equally impactful of 2020.

Thompson, 32, currently in his final year of PhD in Musical Arts at Yale, began considering his new job not only after the first wave of deaths from COVID-19, but after the murder of George Floyd on May 25, 2020. “I turned to [James] Baldwin for solace, ”Thompson said in a recent phone interview, and he began discussing the possibility of using the American writer’s words in an orchestral healing work for the Yale Philharmonia. Conductor Peter Oundjian encouraged the idea – and it is Oundjian himself who will lead guest performances of Thompson’s work by the Seattle Symphony.

On the advice of Baldwin scholar Eddie Glaude, professor of African-American studies at Princeton, Thompson chose three texts to highlight in his article: excerpts from Baldwin’s 1972 essay “No Name in the Street.” ; a speech to the National Press Club that Baldwin gave on December 10, 1986, a year before his death; and “An open letter to my sister, Miss Angela DavisWhich The New York Review of Books published in its January 7, 1971 issue, which provides the article with its title and pointed opening words:

“So be it. We can’t wake up [the] sleeper, and God knows we’ve tried. We must do what we can do [to] strengthen and save each other … [We know that democracy is] freedom for all to aspire to the best that is in us.

But why define Baldwin’s words for a narrator backed by an orchestra, rather than a singer or choir, as Thompson’s vast experience as a conductor and composer suggests? The warning of the potential for the singing virus to spread was a concern for Thompson, but the nature of Baldwin’s own prose was even more influential. As he selected the lyrics, Thompson admitted, “I could hear melodies to go along with it.” But he soon realized that Baldwin’s writing is so closely tied to the fluid cadences of Baldwin’s own oratorical eloquence that adding music to it would “rob the text of its inherent musicality.”

For Seattle Symphony performances, the narrator will be Seattle Pacific University composer / conductor Stephen Newby.

Thompson did most of the work on “To Awaken the Sleeper”, a co-commission of the Seattle Symphony, last spring and finished it in July. Glaude himself was the narrator for the August 2021 premiere, conducted by Oundjian, at the Colorado Music Festival, of which Oundjian is the musical director. (Further performances of the piece are planned in Atlanta, Kansas City, and Indianapolis.) Selecting works for his Seattle Symphony guest conductor concert, Oundjian surrounded Thompson’s work with music by Maurice Ravel ; another African-American composer, Florence Price; and the short and punchy Symphony No. 1 (1936) by Samuel Barber.

The busy young composer, unfortunately, will not be in Seattle; he will be in Houston on December 9 for the premiere of his opera “The Snowy Day”, based on the beloved 1962 children’s book by Ezra Jack Keats. His work and that of Price are the first two of seven pieces programmed by African-American composers in this season’s main concert series.

“To Awaken the Sleeper” by Joel Thompson and works by Barber, Price, Ravel

7:30 p.m. on December 2, 8 p.m. on December 4; Seattle Symphony at Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; $ 39 to $ 134; 206-215-4747, seattlesymphony.org


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Publication of joint studies by Iranian and American academics on Russian composer Dmitry Shostakovich https://allanpettersson.org/publication-of-joint-studies-by-iranian-and-american-academics-on-russian-composer-dmitry-shostakovich/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 14:47:59 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/publication-of-joint-studies-by-iranian-and-american-academics-on-russian-composer-dmitry-shostakovich/ TEHRAN – A book presenting joint studies by Iranian scholar Amir-Hossein Ramezani and American music critic and author David Hurwitz has been published. Ramezani and a large number of academics and musicians, including Nader Mashayekhi, attended a ceremony on Friday evening at Rudaki Hall in Tehran to present the book “Shostakovich Symphonies and Concertos”. A […]]]>

TEHRAN – A book presenting joint studies by Iranian scholar Amir-Hossein Ramezani and American music critic and author David Hurwitz has been published.

Ramezani and a large number of academics and musicians, including Nader Mashayekhi, attended a ceremony on Friday evening at Rudaki Hall in Tehran to present the book “Shostakovich Symphonies and Concertos”.

A book of the same title by Hurwitz was published in 2006.

Speaking at the ceremony, Ramezani said: “As a student, when I was studying at the Iranian Academy of Music, I was given the task of researching Shostakovich’s Symphony 1.

“It was amazing that someone could have composed such a great symphony when I was 18, and at that point I wondered if I could do the same at 18. Obviously, that didn’t happen, but it was the first time I had learned something about Shostakovich, ”he added.

Ramezani said his desire to study on Shostakovich grew when he read Hurwitz’s book on the Soviet-era composer and pianist. He was really convinced that the materials of Hurwitz’s book of about 250 pages could be developed.

The idea of ​​expanding the book was warmly welcomed by Hurwitz, who also encouraged Ramezani to continue his studies on the subject.

“I also did a few interviews with Hurwitz for the book and the result is what was published in the 652 pages of the book,” Ramezani said.

Examples of Shostakovich’s symphonies and concertos on DVD were also offered with the book.

Former Tehran Symphony Orchestra conductor Mashayekhi also gave a speech and said that he awaits the publication of such a book in Iran and called “Shostakovich Symphonies and Concertos” one of the most important books published in the field of music in the country. .

“This book can familiarize us technically with the much larger dimensions of Shostakovich’s artistic character,” he noted.

“This book has attempted to analyze the marvelous character of Shostakovich from a political and social point of view; it also gives new perspectives on his personality, ”he added.

The book was published by Naay-o-Ney in early October. The second edition will be released soon.

Shostakovich is considered one of the major composers of the 20th century, with a unique harmonic language and historical significance due to his years of work under Stalin.

His orchestral works include 15 symphonies and six concertos. His chamber compositions include 15 string quartets, a piano quintet, two piano trios and two pieces for string octet. His solo piano works include two sonatas, a first set of preludes and a subsequent set of 24 preludes and fugues.

Hurwitz’s book “Shostakovich Symphonies and Concertos: An Owner’s Manual” was published on May 1, 2006, by Amadeus Press.

In it, Hurwitz stated that the fall of the Soviet Empire did not diminish the popularity of Shostakovich’s great symphonies and concertos, despite the fact that most of the literature on him neglects any substantive discussion of the music it – even for the benefit of biographical speculations on the relationship between the composer and the political climate of the time.

The book was the first to provide a detailed descriptive analysis of the 21 symphonies and concertos, work by work, explaining not only why they are important documents of their time and place, but why they are great music in general. It allows readers to understand why Shostakovich’s music enjoys the constant support of performers and listeners, and how it generally fits into the great tradition of Western classical music.

Photo: Writer Amir-Hossein Ramezani (4th R), composers and music specialists attend a meeting at Rudaki Hall in Tehran on November 19, 2021, to present the book “Shostakovich Symphonies and Concertos”.

MMS / YAW


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Holland Bach Society presents the composer’s lesser-known sacred music to local audiences https://allanpettersson.org/holland-bach-society-presents-the-composers-lesser-known-sacred-music-to-local-audiences/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:00:13 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/holland-bach-society-presents-the-composers-lesser-known-sacred-music-to-local-audiences/ HOLLAND – The Holland Bach Society, a music project led by Scott Vanden Berg, seeks to bring the sacred compositions of Johann Sebastian Bach to more audiences in the Netherlands region. Bach, widely regarded as one of the greatest composers in history, does not need to be introduced. -Tempered Keyboard and Goldberg Variations for piano. […]]]>

HOLLAND – The Holland Bach Society, a music project led by Scott Vanden Berg, seeks to bring the sacred compositions of Johann Sebastian Bach to more audiences in the Netherlands region.

Bach, widely regarded as one of the greatest composers in history, does not need to be introduced. -Tempered Keyboard and Goldberg Variations for piano.

The Holland Bach Society performs works by JS Bach at the Second Reformed Church in Zeeland.

But Vanden Berg said some of Bach’s greatest music – hundreds of compositions written for church services, many during his time in the employ of a church in Leipzig, Germany – is less well known and less often performed. . About 75 percent of Bach’s music was written for use in worship.

Vanden Berg seeks to change this by performing the composer’s cantatas, which are vocal works with orchestral accompaniment, in local churches with a group of around 30 professional musicians from the region.

The group’s performances are incorporated into the host church’s Sunday worship service, blending the church’s existing worship with elements of early 18th-century liturgical practices.

“Just by nature, these works are designed to be in a church service,” said Vanden Berg. “Maybe when you take them out of a church and into a concert hall, something is lost.

“His cantatas were really related to the Bible stories they were talking about, so they naturally work very well if they follow the scripture readings. In Bach’s day you would have heard the scripture reading, the cantata, and then a sermon on the scripture. same passage They all interact to create a really powerful message.

Bach’s sacred music can be both a musical and theological experience for Christians, said Vanden Berg, bringing them back to Christian worship from another era to learn how their predecessors worshiped and how they viewed their God.

Director Scott Vanden Berg rehearses with the Holland Bach Society ahead of their inaugural performances this month.

Director Scott Vanden Berg rehearses with the Holland Bach Society ahead of their inaugural performances this month.

Upcoming performances will be at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, November 21 at Fourteenth Street Christian Reformed Church, 14 W. 14th St., The Netherlands, and at 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 21 at Central Avenue Christian Reformed Church. , 259 Central Ave. ., Holland. Everyone is welcome.

Kristin Goodyke is the director of operations for the Holland Bach Society, assistant to Vanden Berg, who is also director of instrumental music at Holland Christian High School, for administrative purposes. Goodyke is organist and co-director of music at Second Reformed Church in Zeeland, where the band first performed on November 14.

Many musicians come from the Holland Symphony Orchestra and the Holland Chorale. Eric Reyes, professor at Hope College, loaned the Society a harpsichord for performances.

Bach composed around 300 cantatas, composing one per week for his church in Leipzig. About 200 survive today – so the Holland Bach Society has plenty of material for future performances.

The group will assess the success of its inaugural performance this month, its funding opportunities and decide what to do next. Vanden Berg hopes that churches and donors are interested in supporting the Society in at least annual performances of Bach’s works.

“We want to highlight what I believe to be extraordinary music that was linked to worship and a community of faith and to highlight both music and theology through the works of Bach. That would be our goal.”

Learn more about hollandbachsociety.org.

– Contact journalist Carolyn Muyskens at cmuyskens@hollandsentinel.com and follow her on Twitter at @cjmuyskens.

This article originally appeared on The Holland Sentinel: Holland Bach Society presents Bach’s sacred music to new audiences



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Architect Glenn Murcutt and composer Georges Lentz team up for the sound installation Cobar https://allanpettersson.org/architect-glenn-murcutt-and-composer-georges-lentz-team-up-for-the-sound-installation-cobar/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/architect-glenn-murcutt-and-composer-georges-lentz-team-up-for-the-sound-installation-cobar/ The Cobar Sound Chapel was due to be completed in the first semester and officially opened in early October. Then came the confinements. But in this rugged part of the world, another six months makes little difference for a graffiti-covered 1930s steel tank turned into a 5 x 5 x 5 meter solar-powered listening booth. […]]]>

The Cobar Sound Chapel was due to be completed in the first semester and officially opened in early October. Then came the confinements.

But in this rugged part of the world, another six months makes little difference for a graffiti-covered 1930s steel tank turned into a 5 x 5 x 5 meter solar-powered listening booth. Lentz, whose daytime job is first violin for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, believes it has even been a godsend.

“It gave us the chance to end things more quietly,” he says. “A project of this nature, of this size, with so many elements, needs time for the best solution to emerge.

Inside the Sound Chapel, open to the elements.

It also gives people time to think about what the Cobar Sound Chapel is all about.

“It is a work of art intended to question our place in the grand scheme of things,” explains the Luxembourger Lentz. “When you are here, you cannot help but feel humbled by the great size of the earth and our own smallness. “

It does this by deliberately mixing high-browser and lowbrow.

“There is the sublime, which you find in Glenn’s extraordinary architecture and in some of the sounds inspired by Aboriginal dot painting, and then there is the grain of the graffiti on the tank, which expresses the earthly realities of the life and, again, find yourself in some of the music, ”Lentz says.

“It’s those harsh realities and looking at something higher than us and connecting the two things.”

Music and architecture come together in the installation with a symmetry that, according to Lentz, concerns the number four: the four walls, the four speakers, the four-channel sound of his composition. String Quartet[s], played by Sydney string quartet The Noise.

Lentz describes the site-specific contemporary 24-hour classic piece (developed from an original six-hour version) as “a gigantic sound wall studded with audio graffiti”.

“The string quartet has been the most iconic genre in classical music for centuries,” he says. “I was interested in exploring what a string quartet could be in the 21st century. “

Lentz on one of his regular visits to Cobar. He plans to organize an annual festival there. Klae McGuiness

Slow music, more electro than classical, is not always easy to listen to. He is influenced by the late 20th century French composer Olivier Messiaen but Messiaen never wrote for electronics. As for him, he said, this is the key. Digital work creates sounds that a live quartet could never achieve.

He concedes it’s an unusual move to bring such music to a remote regional town.

“You may well wonder why you take this demanding art and, rather than showcasing it in an arty downtown space, put it somewhere where people are much less likely to know its language.

“But this is where it gets interesting for me. I can take it out there, plant a seed where it’s totally unknown and see what happens.

Every year, Lentz plans to hold a string quartet festival in Cobar, and the musicians he brings to town will also work with local children and encourage them to compose their own music.

Glenn Murcutt says he was thrilled to be a part of the project. James alcock

The installation is unusual, agrees Murcutt. “It has a crazy side. Yet, on the other hand, he has a beautiful side. Here’s a remote community that gets something you can only get in the city, and that’s important. “

The Cobar Sound Project isn’t the first time someone has asked the architect to consider music in the desert. He says the late Woiworrung and Yorta Yorta, former Burnum Burnum activist, who died in 1997, suggested that they design a place where the didgeridoo could be performed alongside Mozart. Nothing came of this idea, so Lentz’s project got him excited.

“My reaction? It was one of elation, one of surprise that there was another person in my career who would want such a thing.

Slow down inside the Sound Chapel, where music and architecture come together in symmetry. Klae McGuiness

It has been a long project, with “endless journeys” between Sydney and Cobar for Lentz, who has just been commissioned to compose a violin concerto by German soloist Arabella Steinbacher to perform with the SSO in 2023.

He estimates the cost of the Cobar Sound Chapel at around $ 300,000. Cobar Shire donated the site, the NSW government supported the project with a $ 200,000 grant, and Cobar Basin gold and silver miner Manuka Resources is a sponsor.

As for Murcutt, it is clear that he is happy with the result. There is a theatrical side to the creation, he says, but “it’s quiet, not loud. Any work of architecture conceived without serenity is, in my opinion, a mistake.

“When serenity possesses joy, it is the pinnacle. This [project] get as close to this statement as any work I have done.

The Sound Chapel will officially open on April 2, with a performance by The Noise.

“They’ll play a Haydn string quartet, going back to the origins of string quartets, and then improvise – which will kick off this whole 24-hour cycle, which just goes on,” says Lentz.


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Norwegian composer is new dean of Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music https://allanpettersson.org/norwegian-composer-is-new-dean-of-yong-siew-toh-conservatory-of-music/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 05:12:30 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/norwegian-composer-is-new-dean-of-yong-siew-toh-conservatory-of-music/ SINGAPORE – Norwegian composer and researcher Peter Tornquist will be the new dean of the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music (YST) at the National University of Singapore from February (2022). He replaces Professor Bernard Lanskey, who had led the conservatory for 14 years before leaving in July of this year to lead the Queensland […]]]>

SINGAPORE – Norwegian composer and researcher Peter Tornquist will be the new dean of the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music (YST) at the National University of Singapore from February (2022).

He replaces Professor Bernard Lanskey, who had led the conservatory for 14 years before leaving in July of this year to lead the Queensland Conservatorium in Australia. YST is currently headed by its interim dean Ho Chee Kong.

NUS President Tan Eng Chye said in a statement Monday (November 15): “After rigorous international research, we are delighted to welcome Dr. Peter Tornquist, who is an influential voice in higher music education .

“Peter’s work has played a pivotal role in establishing artistic research as an essential area of ​​knowledge in modern conservatories, and a strategic tool for developing students as curious artists. With his deep understanding of the changing landscape of higher music education in the 21st century, I am confident that YST will continue to make great strides under Peter’s leadership. “

Dr Tornquist was director of the Norwegian Academy of Music from 2013 to July of this year. Prior to that, he was its Head of Composition, Music Theory and Technology, and Associate Professor of Composition.

His compositions, which have been performed by ensembles such as the Oslo Philharmonic, the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra and the London Sinfonietta, focus on the interaction between composers and performers through live electronics and improvisation.

Dr Tornquist said he was delighted to join YST.

He said: “In a rapidly changing global economy, our job as educators is to prepare students to push the boundaries and explore the full potential of their musical identity.”

“My sincere thanks to Professor Bernard Lanskey for his leadership, which has made YST the dynamic conservatory it is today, and I look forward to contributing my experience to furthering the Conservatory’s mission.”


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Adventurous composer Carson Kievman is dead https://allanpettersson.org/adventurous-composer-carson-kievman-is-dead/ https://allanpettersson.org/adventurous-composer-carson-kievman-is-dead/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/adventurous-composer-carson-kievman-is-dead/ Carson Kievman at a fundraiser in Miami for Sobe Arts The longtime Miami resident has made a major contribution to local culture and music education. MIAMI, FL, USA, November 11, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Carson Kievman, Miami-based composer, producer and educator, has passed away at the age of 72. Kievman was an integral member of the […]]]>

Carson Kievman at a fundraiser in Miami for Sobe Arts

The longtime Miami resident has made a major contribution to local culture and music education.

MIAMI, FL, USA, November 11, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Carson Kievman, Miami-based composer, producer and educator, has passed away at the age of 72. Kievman was an integral member of the South Florida music scene. Along with his many contributions, Kievman founded the SoBe Arts Institute in Miami Beach. Born in Los Angeles, Kievman had been part of the South Florida music scene since the 1970s. In the late 1980s, he was the composer of the Florida Philharmonic, for which he wrote his second symphony. Kievman will write 6 other symphonies during his life.

Kievman briefly left South Florida for a doctoral program at Princeton University, but returned to found Sobe Arts, a school that offered financial aid to musically gifted middle and high school students. The school was also the base for SoBe Arts, Kievman’s arts company, which produced several of his musical theater works.

Prior to his stay in Miami, Kievman studied with Earl Brown at the California Institute of the Arts. He also had two residences in Paris, with the famous French composer Olivier Messiaen. While in Paris, he attended the famous summer studies in Darmstadt, known as a gathering place for avant-garde composers in the 1960s. While in Darmstadt, Kievman worked with visionaries such as Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luigi Nono and Luciano Berio. In 1977, Kievman became a Bernstein Fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center. While at Tanglewood, his score for “Wake Up, It’s Time to go to bed” was produced with great success. The following year, Kievman became composer in residence at the Public Theater in New York City, working under the direction of the legendary Joseph Papp, writing new works and accompanying scores for plays.

During his lifetime, Kievman’s work included 10 operas, eight symphonies and numerous pieces of chamber and choral music. Kievman had a unique voice and enriched the South Florida music scene with his vast and innovative contributions.

Carl Kruse, curator of the Carl Kruse’s Blog, was actively involved in SoBe Arts, organizing fundraisers for the organization and serving on the project board from 2010 to 2014. With the blog, he offers his condolences to the friends and family of Carson Kievman.

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The film composer was 78 – Deadline https://allanpettersson.org/the-film-composer-was-78-deadline/ https://allanpettersson.org/the-film-composer-was-78-deadline/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 09:54:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-film-composer-was-78-deadline/ Joanna Bruzdowicz, the Franco-Polish composer whose far-reaching work included several collaborations with Agnès Varda, has died at the age of 78. His family confirmed to Deadline that Bruzdowicz passed away peacefully in his music studio in the French Pyrenees. “The shock of his departure is so great and so sudden that it seems impossible to […]]]>

Joanna Bruzdowicz, the Franco-Polish composer whose far-reaching work included several collaborations with Agnès Varda, has died at the age of 78.

His family confirmed to Deadline that Bruzdowicz passed away peacefully in his music studio in the French Pyrenees.

“The shock of his departure is so great and so sudden that it seems impossible to deal with our loss as a family,” commented his son Jörg Tittel. “We can be reassured to know that she will continue to speak to us through her music. I hope his early departure will lead more people to discover his foundational work. “

Born in Warsaw, Bruzdowicz was a child prodigy and wrote her first concerto at the age of 6. She studied at Warsaw Music High School, State Higher School of Music, and obtained her Masters in 1966.

Benefiting from a scholarship from the French government, she continued her studies in Paris and became a pupil of Nadia Boulanger, Olivier Messiaen and Pierre Schaeffer. She joined the Electroacoustic Musical Research Group and wrote her doctoral thesis Mathematics and logic in contemporary music at the Sorbonne.

After completing her studies in France, she moved to Belgium with her late husband, Horst-Jürgen Tittel, former senior adviser to the President of the European Commission. There she worked through opera, symphonic music and chamber music, composing scores for film and television.

Bruzdowicz had a long-standing relationship with revered Polish director Agnès Varda – who died in 2019 – and the couple collaborated on titles including the winner of the Golden Lion of Venice. Vagabond and his documentary The gleaners and me.

Together with her husband Tittel, she created the German episodic series Stahlkammer Zürich, which lasted 36 episodes and for which Bruzdowicz wrote over 15 hours of music.

Later in life, she collaborated with her son Jörg Tittel and her daughter-in-law Alex Helfrecht, including composing the score for their first feature film. The White King.

Bruzdowicz has also co-founded musical organizations such as the Chopin-Szymanowski Association in Belgium, the Jeunesses Musicales in Poland, the GIMEP in France and the Rencontres Internationales de la Musique in Catalonia.

Bruzdowicz leaves three sons: Mark, Jan and Jörg Tittel, four grandchildren and a great grandchild.



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Handel and Haydn prove that French composer Louise Farrenc deserves a wider audience https://allanpettersson.org/handel-and-haydn-prove-that-french-composer-louise-farrenc-deserves-a-wider-audience/ https://allanpettersson.org/handel-and-haydn-prove-that-french-composer-louise-farrenc-deserves-a-wider-audience/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 22:29:34 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/handel-and-haydn-prove-that-french-composer-louise-farrenc-deserves-a-wider-audience/ “She’s a 19th century French composer, in Beethoven’s time,” I heard a man explain to a well-dressed elderly woman entering Symphony Hall on Friday night. It was not difficult to deduce that this was a sequel to the question “who is Louise Farrenc?” “Or” who is this composer whom I have never heard of, whose […]]]>

“She’s a 19th century French composer, in Beethoven’s time,” I heard a man explain to a well-dressed elderly woman entering Symphony Hall on Friday night. It was not difficult to deduce that this was a sequel to the question “who is Louise Farrenc?” “Or” who is this composer whom I have never heard of, whose music is performed this evening by the Handel and Haydn Society. ? “

As the classical music world scrambles to extend the canon of the common practice period beyond standard dead white men, Farrenc – a pianist, composer, and educator who was the first female professor at the Paris Conservatory – is become one of the many women whose music is belatedly acclaimed. On Friday evening at Symphony Hall, French conductor Laurence Equilbey made her H + H debut with the very first performance of the Orchester de la Société Handel et Haydn de Farrenc, who was ten years old at the time of the foundation of the Handel and Haydn Society in 1815..

With Insula Orchestra, the period instrument ensemble based in France that she founded in 2012, Equilbey has carried the torch of Farrenc and other unknown composers for several years; Last summer, Equilbey and Insula celebrated the release of an album on Warner Classics featuring Farrenc’s Symphonies Nos 1 and 3. Farrenc’s Symphony No. 3 with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6, “Pastorale”, is on the H&H program this weekend.

In a historical sense, it was a premonitory gesture. Parisian audiences of Farrenc’s day preferred opera and chamber music to symphonic music, and for the Conservatory orchestra, which premiered Farrenc’s Symphony No. 3, Beethoven was the undisputed king. From a current programming standpoint, it was also smart; Beethoven’s joyous “Pastoral” symphony will fill the seats no matter what is in the other half of the program. Friday drew a respectable sized crowd to Symphony Hall, and it’s probably safe to say that both Farrenc and Equilbey have new admirers.

The orchestra greeted Farrenc’s symphony like an old friend, without any tenacity about it. Clarinetist Eric Hoeprich introduced the second lullaby-like movement with a languid, liquid solo; even without programmatic Beethoven-style imagery, there was a lot of pastoral care about the Farrenc symphony. Principal violin Aisslinn Nosky gathered the strings through the twisty and fast scherzo of the third movement, interrupted by a distinguished trio with a horn melody that clearly sounded like “A-Hunting We Will Go”. The unaffected and deeply nuanced performance was perhaps the best case that could have been done for Farrenc’s full inclusion in the canon; why not a Louise Farrenc symphony instead of a new cover of something by Robert Schumann or Felix Mendelssohn?

While Equilbey and the orchestra treated the unknown piece like a beloved chestnut, they treated Beethoven’s Symphony No.6 as something fresh and without expectations. Equilbey’s approach was lean and unfussy, emphasizing the darker hues of the generally relentlessly sunny symphony. It was particularly revealing in the second movement, “Scene by the Brook”. Even the fullest textures were surprisingly transparent, showing the depth and nuance of Beethoven’s orchestration. The repetitive peasant dance of the third movement often bogs down with a syrupy sheen, but the peasants of Equilbey were deliciously quick, giving the passage of time cut a harsh contrast. Timpanist Jonathan Hess spoke of a violent storm that blew up several spectators in their seats, before the tender hymn of the finale cast a golden light on everything. The evening ended with a surprise encore, the opening “The Ruins of Athens” by Beethoven; the symphony duo had seemed like a complete evening on its own, but I wasn’t going to deny a few extra minutes in the world the band on stage had created.

HANDEL AND HAYDN COMPANY

Friday. at the symphony hall. Sunday rehearsal. www.handelandhaydn.org


AZ Madonna can be contacted at az.madonna@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @knitandlisten.



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German composer Frieder Bernius to perform in Turkey https://allanpettersson.org/german-composer-frieder-bernius-to-perform-in-turkey/ https://allanpettersson.org/german-composer-frieder-bernius-to-perform-in-turkey/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 06:07:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/german-composer-frieder-bernius-to-perform-in-turkey/ German conductor Frieder Bernius will perform in Turkey, Turkey’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism said on Thursday. The founder and director of the chamber choir Kammerchor Stuttgart will conduct a series of concerts and formations in Istanbul and the capital Ankara. Hosted by the General Directorate of Fine Arts of Turkey, the events will be […]]]>

German conductor Frieder Bernius will perform in Turkey, Turkey’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism said on Thursday.

The founder and director of the chamber choir Kammerchor Stuttgart will conduct a series of concerts and formations in Istanbul and the capital Ankara.

Hosted by the General Directorate of Fine Arts of Turkey, the events will be held in association with the German Embassy and the Goethe-Institut in Ankara.

Bernius will first give a concert at Istanbul’s new Atatürk Cultural Center (AKM) on November 14.

Two days later, he will perform at CSO Ada Ankara, a concert hall in the Turkish capital.

As part of a project of the Turkish State Polyphonic Choir and Maestro Burak Onur Erdem, the young musicians of the State Polyphonic Choir will receive intensive training from Bernius and also give a concert under the direction of the famous conductor of orchestra.

In Bernius’ concerts, Turkish musical instruments such as tambur and ney will accompany the orchestra to create a synthesis of classical music from Anatolia and Central Europe.

The orchestra will also perform a few pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach, early Romantic German composer Felix Mendelssohn and Austrian composer Anton Bruckner.

Bernius founded the Kammerchor Stuttgart in 1968 and has conducted the largest orchestras and choirs in Germany such as the Stuttgart Radio Symphony, the WDR Symphony and the RIAS Chamber Choir.


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